Spotlight ON, Henschel Hs 129

The Spotlight ON series provides a brief history of the subject aircraft and a set of specially commissioned images in full colour and full page of a selection of aircraft of the type operating in different theatres . This new addition to the series covers the unique Hs 129 which was an important anti-tank and close support aircraft in German service. – Highly Recommended

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

NAME: Spotlight ON, Henschel Hs 129
FILE: R2902
AUTHOR: Krzysztof Wolowski
PUBLISHER: Stratus, MMPBooks
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 43
PRICE: £19.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, Eastern Front, 
Western Front, North Africa, ground attack, flying artillery, anti-tank aircraft, 
armoured aircraft, close support, bomber, anti-tank gun, 37mm AAG, 75mm AAG, 
Red Army, Soviet armour, desert 

ISBN: 978-3-65958-27-3

IMAGE: B2902.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y377wltm
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The Spotlight ON series provides a brief history of the subject 
aircraft and a set of specially commissioned images in full colour and full page of a 
selection of aircraft of the type operating in different theatres . This new addition to 
the series covers the unique Hs 129 which was an important anti-tank and close 
support aircraft in German service.  –   Highly Recommended

The Ju 87 Stuka has captured imagination and is widely recognized as an important 
German aircraft of WWII. It was specifically designed to provide close air support to 
the fast moving panzer divisions and it served throughout WWII. However, the Ju 87 
was obsolescent in 1940 and had to be withdrawn from the Battle of Britain because 
it was an easy target for Hurricanes and Spitfires of the RAF. Its replacement was 
envisaged as the Hs129 which was designed to a specification issued in 1937 and 
competed with a Focke Wulf design.

Where the Ju 87 was originally designed as a dive bomber with a two man crew and 
minimum defensive gun armament, the Hs129 was designed as an armoured single 
seat attack aircraft that could carry bombs under the fuselage but was also intended to 
carry a large anti-tank gun. There were a number of changes to the specification and 
a relatively small number of aircraft were produced, rather later than they should 
have been. The primary use of the aircraft was against Soviet armour on the Eastern 
front and the 37mm anti-tank gun was replaced with a 75mm gun in what should 
have been a large production run that never materialized.

The Hs 129 was never deployed in adequate numbers where it could have made a 
significant difference to the balance of power between German and Soviet armour. 
The tactics for attacking Soviet armour had been developed by Oberst Rudel, flying 
a Ju 87 armed with two under wing 40mm cannon. This required a slow low attack 
from behind the Soviet tanks to fie into their weaker rear armour which was an 
extremely dangerous approach that saw many German aircraft shot down and Rudel
 himself was shot down a number of times, escaping capture, except on one occasion 
where he was captured and then escaped. The 75mm armed Hs 129 would have 
provided a more effective platform. However, the future of close support lay with 
rockets and the RAF Hawker Typhoons played a major role in the Normandy landings 
and the advance on Germany, flying in cab ranks and being called down to rocket 
German tanks and other targets of opportunity.