Spoils of War, The Fate of Enemy Fleets after the Two World Wars

The fate of enemy fleets after the two World Wars, was a very important part of Treaty negotiations. The Treaty following WWI was generally accepted as too severe, creating the ground for German resentment and a new World War. As a result, the Allies were more sensitive and constructive in several ways, aided by the Western Allies seeing the threat then posed to them by the USSR – Most Highly Recommended

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NAME:    Spoils of War, The Fate of Enemy Fleets after the Two World Wars
FILE: R3218
AUTHOR: Aidan Dodson, Serena Cant
PUBLISHER: Seaforth Publishing, Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £35.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   WWI, World War I, World War 1, First World War, The Great War, 
WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, war at sea, naval technology, 
naval architecture, surrender, spoils of war

ISBN: 978-1-5267-6198-1

PAGES: 328
IMAGE: B3218.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y2eopv97
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The fate of enemy fleets after the two World Wars, was a very 
important part of Treaty negotiations. The Treaty following WWI was generally 
accepted as too severe, creating the ground for German resentment and a new 
World War. As a result, the Allies were more sensitive and constructive in 
several ways, aided by the Western Allies seeing the threat then posed to them 
by the USSR –  Most Highly Recommended


This is the type of book at which this publisher excels. It is large format, handsomely produced, with careful research, readable text and a multitude of first class illustrations. There are also the detailed appendices and very informative Retrospective. This is a book to satisfy the well-informed enthusiast, the professional, but also those starting to develop their knowledge of military and political history, packaged at an aggressive price for a book of this quality.

Considering the great impact on future events by the division of spoils of war, this is a subject that has received remarkably little coverage by historians, usually being a foot note to a study into other events.

After WWI, the victorious Allies were primarily concerned with ensuring that the Germans lost all of their critical military technology and the means to replace it. Germany was left intact as a nation but lost important parts of what it regarded as Greater Germany and the core of an Empire. After WWII, the Allies divided and occupied all of Germany, attempted to restore pre-Nazi boundaries, faced the division of the Allies as Stalin tried to seize control of Europe and change boundaries by moving Poland westward.

Initially, the Allies raced to seize German technology, particularly in submarine, aviation and rocketry. The Russians undertook an even deeper looting of German assets and removed complete factories from East Germany. The speed of break down of the wartime alliance also meant that the Western Allies had to actively rebuild Germany military capability as part of the refocus into the Cold War. That meant that naval assets were returned, and the West German Government was allowed and assisted in the raising of scuttled submarines.

The authors have covered the fortunes of the spoils of war following both World Wars and produced a number of valuable insights.