Some Sunny Day, A nurse, A soldier. A wartime love story

A delightful account of two people against the backdrop of the Burma campaign. Nurses served close to, and sometimes behind the enemy lines in Burma. It is a story that has never been told well and this book puts that right – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Some Sunny Day, A nurse, A soldier. A wartime love story
FILE: R2680
AUTHOR: Madge Lambert
PUBLISHER: Pan/Macmillan
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  360
PRICE: £7.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, Second World War, World War 2, The 
Forgotten Army, Burma, India, nursing, field hospitals, love story

ISBN: 978-1-5098-5937-5

IMAGE: B2680.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yd6v22mb
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: A delightful account of two people against the backdrop 
of the Burma campaign. Nurses served close to, and sometimes behind 
the enemy lines in Burma. It is a story that has never been told well 
and this book puts that right – Most Highly Recommended.

The author was called up and left her peacetime hospital in England 
for Chittagong and the very different environment of war against the 
Japanese in the jungle fighting in Burma. Hospitals were established 
in India and then down into Burma. The US MASH of the Korean War may 
have been immortalized on film and TV, but British doctors and nurses 
provided even closer medical support to the Allied Forces in Burma. 
By the 1950s, the helicopter was revolutionising medivac of wounded 
soldiers, but in Burma the wounded were evacuated on foot, on donkeys 
and mules, sometimes by jeep and also by light 'bush' aircraft. There 
was also one medivac by helicopter when one of the Sikorski R4 
Hoverfly machines acquired for evaluation by British military was 
used to bring out a wounded soldier from one of the Chindit units 
operating deep behind enemy lines. The Chindit campaigns required 
the medical teams to work as close as possible to the front line 
and some were sent behind the line to set up basic facilities for 
the Chindits who were fighting on through the jungle in the rear of 
the Japanese main forces.

It was dangerous and exhausting work. The medical staff worked 
miracles and achieved amazing success rates, as often treating 
disease, as treating battle wounds.

This is a story that is heart-warming, inspiring and poignant. It 
is a story of courage, sacrifice, comradeship, love and endurance.

This a story that will appeal to a very wide readership and deserves 
to be a best seller.

We should be very grateful that one of these nurses has found time 
to write such a wonderful account of life for her, her comrades and 
their patients in what was a Forgotten War.