Siege Warfare During The Crusades

The definitive guide to siege warfare during the Crusades. The set piece battles of the crusades may have been well-recounted by historians but not the significance of the many sieges. – Very Highly Recommended.

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

http://ftnews.firetrench.com

NAME: Siege Warfare During The Crusades
FILE: R3092
AUTHOR: Michael S Fulton
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £30.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: The Crusades, Medieval warfare, soldiers, armies, engineers, 
fortifications, castles, fortified towns and cities, mining, besieging, artillery, 
starvation, disease, treachery, counter strike, water supplies

ISBN: 1-52671-865-0

PAGES: 344
IMAGE: B3092.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/v2qaeah

DESCRIPTION: The definitive guide to siege warfare during the Crusades. The set 
piece battles of the crusades may have been well-recounted by historians but not 
the significance of the many sieges. – Very Highly Recommended.

The Crusades were largely a conflict between Franks and Muslims but they also drew 
in crusaders from across the Christian countries. During the conflict, there were a 
number of set piece battles between the Muslims and the Crusaders. Some of these 
were large and have captured the attention of historians. Strangely, the many sieges 
have received very little coverage. This is surprising because the conflict was dictated 
by the fortified towns and fixed defences. Much of the Crusaders' efforts were 
expended in building chains of Crusaders Forts and the taking of fortified towns.

The Middle Ages saw the castle rising to the ultimate symbol of the military age. 
Villages and towns were defended settlements that usually included a fort or castle as 
the seat of government, prison, and military defence. Where a village might have just 
a moat or simple fence to keep out predatory animals and raiders, towns featured 
sophisticated stone walls with towers and artillery in addition to one or more castles 
within the walls. Combatants looked for a quick victory and this could be best 
achieved by tempting the enemy out from his defences to meet in set-piece battle. As 
a war of movement, it could involve two armies following each other and fighting at 
points along their progress. If an army could be routed, or key commanders captured, 
the conflict could be short lived with a clear winner. Where this did not prove 
possible, one or both sides would fall back on an armed progress, besieging castles 
and towns until the enemy was forced to surrender.

A siege was a bloody no-holds barred fight. The defenders hoped to entice the 
besieger into frontal assaults where the defences were designed to cause the 
maximum casualty rate, but a wise besieger would camp out of weapon range, 
encircling the fixed defences, turning the defence into a trap and starving the enemy 
out. During the siege, siege artillery would attempt to cause maximum damage and 
injury inside the defences, engineers would attempt to undermine the walls, even 
infected corpses were fired over the walls to reduce the enemy by contagions. By the 
time of the crusades, the art of siege warfare had not greatly changed since before the 
time of the Romans.

The author has provided an insightful analysis of siege warfare, lavishly illustrated 
by maps, sketches and full colour images.