Ship Style, modernism and modernity at sea in the 20th century

B1626

Conway maritime titles provide information that is rarely seen in other published work. This book addresses style and design of passenger ships during the last hundred years.

The authors have covered the design trends and the recent taste for retro designs. Colour printing has been employed so that the lavish illustration includes many high quality full colour photographs, maps and drawings. An important review of maritime design over a hundred year period.

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Firetrench Directory

NAME: Ship Style, modernism and modernity at sea in the 20th century
CLASSIFICATION: Book reviews
FILE: R1626
Date: 031110
AUTHOR: Philip Dawson, Bruce Peter
PUBLISHER: Conway, Anova
BINDING: Hard back
PAGES: 240
PRICE: GB £30.00
GENRE: Non-Fiction
SUBJECT:
ISBN: 978-1-84486-127-9
IMAGE: B1626
LINKS: http://tinyurl.com/
DESCRIPTION: Conway maritime titles provide information that is rarely seen in other published work. This book addresses style and design of passenger ships during the last hundred years. By the late Victorian period, passenger liners and cargo liners had moved on from being just ships that carried people across seas and oceans. The great liners, including the ill fated Titanic that has become a tragic maritime icon, were lavishly equipped. At the beginning of the period a great liner would carry a cross section of contemporary society. The first class section provided the luxury that those passengers took for granted ashore. The liner then worked down the social scale to steerage class facilities which were fair approximations of poor crowded conditions in the industrial towns. From that point, first class accommodation continues to be luxurious, but the lower classes of accommodation continued to improve. In the first half of the period, the ocean liner was unchallenged as a method of transport between continents and even on shorter distances continued to offer the most dependable and affordable means of transport. Towards the end of the first period aviation was beginning to demonstrate the potential for faster travel taking the First and Second Class passengers off the liners. After World War Two, ocean liners continued to hold their own against aviation although they progressively came to carry those who could not afford air travel. The need for the high quality styling in first class accommodation declined but the lack of new build liners meant ships equipped for traffic that was no longer there. Then fortunes revived with the growing cruise trade which has led to ever larger and more extravagantly equipped vessels that are now effectively towns that float and move around the world dropping and collecting passengers who often fly to and from the ports that the vessel calls at. There was also the unique American nuclear powered commercial vessel that was built as a cargo passenger ship. The authors have covered the design trends and the recent taste for retro designs. Colour printing has been employed so that the lavish illustration includes many high quality full colour photographs, maps and drawings. An important review of maritime design over a hundred year period.

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