Sheriffmuir 1715, The Jacobite War in Scotland

B2064

The author has provided an accurate account of the events leading to Sheriffmuir to coincide with the three hundredth anniversary. It is a moving and sad story and all the more pertinent as the latter day dependency party, the SNP, tries to replace union with the rest of the British with subservience to Brussels.

This enjoyable book provides a comprehensive account of the battle of Sheriffmuir, throwing light on how it was fought. It has included eyewitness accounts, some previously unpublished and all important to the understanding of this fight. There are also chapters that review the organization, training, weapons, and tactics for both the Jacobite forces and the Government army. It may not convert any of those strongly holding to established views from either extreme, but it will allow the more open minded to consider this critical part of Scottish history.

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NAME: Sheriffmuir 1715, The Jacobite War in Scotland
DATE: 141114
FILE: R2064
AUTHOR: Stuart Reid
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 214
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Jacobites, insurrection, religion, clans, Scots, Highlanders, Covenant, Coventanters, rebellion, Stuarts, French intervention, Highland Charge
ISBN: 1-84832-732-0
IMAGE: B2064.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/nvrfx8u
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The author has provided an accurate account of the events leading to Sheriffmuir to coincide with the three hundredth anniversary. It is a moving and sad story and all the more pertinent as the latter day dependency party, the SNP, tries to replace union with the rest of the British with subservience to Brussels.

The concept of ‘Scottishness’ has long been a romantic notion that ignores the multi-cultural heritage of the northern areas of the British Isles. During the Victorian era, families across, what is generally regarded as, Scotland ‘discovered’ their family tartan in a mass self-deception, or mass creativity. The romantic notion of the Brave Highlanders loyally defending Scottish honour and independence is equally false. The reality is somewhat darker, less noble, and very sad. France had long manipulated the Scots in an attempt to destroy the English and Sheriffmuir came at the end of the potentially successful dominations of Scotland by France and victory over the English. Today that manipulation has returned with the EUSSR in Brussels trying to stoke the fires and another generation of Scottish traitors attempting to impose their racist ideas on their neighbours with a close eye on personal wealth creation for the political elite of the SNP.

The racial divisions of Scotland provide a map of invasion over the centuries. The peoples of the Islands owe much to their Norse ancestry, but there are also strong Norse elements in the Highlands. The Irish, then the real Scots, colonized much of the South and Central parts of Scotland and the Romans were not confined to the South of Hadrian’s Wall, as is popularly accepted, but built roads, forts, ports, and other walls far to the North, leaving artefacts as far North as Aberdeen and Inverness. Then Norse and Norman families established themselves in the Lordship of Galloway and the Borders, to create the Galwegian heritage. That racial division has been reflected in Scottish conflict every since, although the golden age of the 18th, 19th and 20th Centuries saw Scots participating in the great expansion of a British Empire, putting behind the disasters of the Jacobites and the Central American bubble that left Scots bankrupt and led to their call for a Union of Parliaments to provide better access to the English Exchequer to replenish of the poverty of their unwise profligacy.

The result is that most notions of Scottish history are romantic and false. The Stuarts, with the possible exceptions of Charles II and the last two Mary Stuarts, proved to be disasters for Scotland and England. When Mary and her husband William of Orange came to the British Throne, they created the conditions that were to lead to a Great British Empire. When the last Stuart Monarch was followed by the Hanoverians, the transformation was completed and Scotland began to benefit strongly in financial and political terms, but so too did the rest of Great Britain, because Scots were entirely complimentary to England, Wales, and Ireland, as those countries were to Scotland.

The Jacobite Rebellions could therefore be seen as personal ambition of the Stuarts, egged on by a France that was being beaten by the British and cut off from successful imperial growth. The Highlanders may have held a romantic support for the Stuarts, but it was more a question of how far their Clan Chieftains were prepared to support the Stuart Pretenders.

In what is a lively and eminently readable account of Sheriffmuir, the author has provided insight and shown how the potential of the Jacobite risings in the Highlands, Nithsdale and Northumberland had the potential to succeed but were doomed to fail, to be followed by an even more wasteful rising in 1745 that finally ended all prospect of a French and Stuart return to rule Scotland.

The Jacobites did not lack courage in battle, but they did lack real cohesion. They were also reluctant to embrace modern battlefield tactics. The Highland Charge was not unlike the Chinese Wave Assault, but the Highlanders lacked the huge numbers on which the Chinese concept depended. Throwing away firearms and rushing at the enemy with sword alone was an unsuccessful tactic against a skilled modern formation that relied on musket and canon under the organization of battle drill formations.

The author has told a story that taken the rising through its stages and shown how the Highland Regiments came to form such an important element of the British Army, when their native courage was combined with modern battle drills and good modern equipment, providing a battle-winning tactical environment.

This enjoyable book provides a comprehensive account of the battle of Sheriffmuir, throwing light on how it was fought. It has included eyewitness accounts, some previously unpublished and all important to the understanding of this fight. There are also chapters that review the organization, training, weapons, and tactics for both the Jacobite forces and the Government army. It may not convert any of those strongly holding to established views from either extreme, but it will allow the more open minded to consider this critical part of Scottish history.

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