Seaforth World Naval Review 2013

B1817

 

The 2013 edition of the Seaforth World Naval Review includes four articles on significant ships, respectively; French Navy, US Coast Guard, German Navy, and Indian Navy. The reviews and articles are insightful and increasing coverage is being given to unmanned and autonomous vehicles.

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NAME: Seaforth World Naval Review 2013
CLASSIFICATION: Book Reviews
FILE: R1817
DATE: 030313
AUTHOR: Editor Conrad Waters
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 192
PRICE: £30.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: warships, aircraft carriers, naval aviation, submarines, anti-submarine, air defence, logistics, assault ships, auxiliary vessels, fleet train, naval aviation
ISBN: 978-1-84832-156-4
IMAGE: B1817.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/cp5ehp5
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The 2013 edition of this popular annual is again edited by Conrad Waters, with contributions from acknowledged specialists in their fields.

This edition may have some surprises. Britain has been ruthlessly emaciating the Royal Navy and it is a case of ‘jam tomorrow’ with the first Queen Elizabeth super carrier progressing slowly towards its launching date and the arrival of the F-35 approaching, but still a way off. The Royal Navy has had to content itself with the ordering of new fleet support vessels, but facing the fact that its last carrier is due to go in 2014 with the new super carriers in danger of slipping further.

However, other navies are fairing better and the Indians are steadily building a significant naval capability with naval aviation expanding and updating. The prospect of an indigenous nuclear missile submarine is set to significantly change the balance of power in the region.

As the pioneer of naval aviation, the Royal Navy, is once again being thrashed by British politicians, the proliferation of naval aviation continues and it will soon be difficult to find a navy that does not have some form of aircraft carrier. Stealth ships are also receiving funding in many navies and littoral combat continues to feature strongly in considerations.

There has been a continuation of the spread of submarines. Several navies that previously had no submarines, or only a very small token force, are now adding vessels. The leasing of an Akula II nuclear attack submarine by India from Russia may only be a temporary step because the Indian concentration is on building a fleet of strategic missile submarines, with the first of class entering service during 2013, with perhaps six more sister ships to be completed, using an indigenous reactor design and ballistic nuclear missile. Canada has at last made good progress in bringing the Upholder Class submarines, purchased from Britain, up to Full Operational Capability. The forth submarine is due to be repaired by 2016 and the Canadians intend keeping one submarine in full readiness on the East Coast and one on the West Coast.

With the exception of the Royal Navy, 2012 has seen most navies coping with the global economic situation and introducing new vessels close to schedule. 2013 may see many differences with the US President determined to change the US into a socialist environment, leading to the automatic introduction of unbalanced budget cuts and tax increases that will have particularly serious consequences for US Forces and defence contractors.

During 2013 there will be a continuation and deepening of the arms race in the Pacific and South East Asia. As North Korea threatens to disregard the Armistice that ended the Korean War, and Iran continuing with its nuclear weapons program the international and world naval situation is becoming increasingly unstable. This is likely to affect naval planning during 2014 and some nations may be forced into another about face to expand and update their naval assets.

The 2013 edition of the Seaforth World Naval Review includes four articles on significant ships, respectively; French Navy, US Coast Guard, German Navy, and Indian Navy. The reviews and articles are insightful and increasing coverage is being given to unmanned and autonomous vehicles.

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