Red October, The Revolution That Changed The World

The author has studied the recent history of Russia, from attending the Joint Services School for Linguists and the career that followed, that adds valuable knowledge and insights to the subject. The event that brutalized Russia from 1917 was to cause and react with a series of major events of the 20th Century to the detriment of the world – Most Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Red October, The Revolution That Changed The World
FILE: R2569
AUTHOR: Douglas Boyd
PUBLISHER: The History Press
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  224
PRICE: £20.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Russia, USSR, Soviet Union, Red October, October Revolution, 
Czar Nicholas, 1917, Russian Civil War, White Russians, Cold War

ISBN: 978-0-7509-8244-3

IMAGE: B2569.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ybyovw8k
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The author has studied the recent history of Russia, 
from attending the Joint Services School for Linguists and the career 
that followed, that adds valuable knowledge and insights to the 
subject. The event that brutalized Russia from 1917 was to cause and 
react with a series of major events of the 20th Century to the 
detriment of the world – Most Highly Recommended.

Considering the effects that the October Revolution had on the world, 
remarkably little is known about it, even less the history of Russia 
before 1917.  This may explain why the Communist Revolution has been 
regarded as a very different course for Russia. Before 1917, Russia 
was largely isolated from the world around it, by the choice of most 
of Russia's rulers. Very few Czars, before the ill-fated Czar 
Nicholas, are known outside Russia, or even inside. Ivan IV, 
Catherine the Great, Peter the Great, are the few who have become 
part of history and received the attentions of historians outside 
Russia. As a result, the terrible course of WWI and the seizure of 
power by Lenin and his Bolsheviks brought the Russian impact on 
international relationships to wide notice. Although the Soviet 
Union then withdrew from the scene until the surprise pact between 
the German Nazis and the Soviets on the eve of WWII, the murder of 
the Czar and his family achieved wide press coverage at the time and 
Russian refugees added to what was accepted as the pool of knowledge.

The result was huge areas that were unknown, a few brief fragments 
of debated knowledge and a larger area of 'knowledge' that was the 
view of those who escaped the Soviet Union, its subjugated nations 
and, later, its European satellites. This is unfortunate because 
politicians have frequently attempted new policies without really 
understanding Russia and the Soviet Union. That failure to understand 
continues to dog international relations and create new tensions.

The reality of Russian history is of a nation in the west that 
originated from the Ukraine and spread out to the east and south 
over the centuries. It rapidly established a political and social 
cycle that has remained largely unchanged, even by Red October. 
Periodically, a strong leader has emerged and expanded the borders 
of Russia. When that leader has died, the next leader has usually 
been much weaker and the Russian Empire has shrunk back, only to be 
followed by another strong leader who has reversed the process and 
expanded the Russian borders. Since 1917, the Soviets have followed 
that process, with Stalin expanding Russian influence and territory, 
followed by weaker leaders who have presided over the subsequent 
retraction of Empire. With the implosion of the Soviet Union in the 
late 1980s, the gains made by Stalin were lost and, with them, 
territories that had long been part of the Russian Empire in the 
centuries before the Soviet revolution. Once more a new stronger 
leader has emerged in the form of Putin, attempting to expand Russian 
territory and influence.

From outside, much of the cycles of expansion and contraction have 
been invisible because Russia has long held a fear of foreigners. It 
has long been a huge country geographically and, like the USA, has 
been able to amuse itself within its borders, coming to note only 
where it has swallowed, or regurgitated, a small neighbour. Within 
its boundaries, it has treated its people very harshly. Ivan IV 
became known as Ivan the Terrible because news of his pogroms emerged 
via the handful of traders from western Europe who were allowed into 
Russia. His hit squads spread out across Russia visiting horror on 
the peasants and the nobles. They were remarkably similar in their 
brutality to the Soviet security organs. Huge unknown numbers of 
people perished in the most horrible manner. Catherine the Great, a 
German woman who married and replaced a Czar, was to follow the 
familiar process of ruling through fear. Outside Russia, Peter the 
Great is often remembered as the Czar who tried to modernize Russia 
and increase its trading interaction with other nations. As a result 
he is often thought of as a benevolent and enlightened ruler. In 
reality he was as brutal and blood soaked as any of the other Czars, 
even having a son knouted to death.

It was perhaps therefore to be expected that the Russian Revolution 
was to be not a triumph of the people rising up against a tyrannical 
Czar, but the seizure of power by a small band of zealots who thought 
they could force Russia into a mould of their design. They created a 
new Russian Empire that followed the traditional path of the cycles of 
Russian expansion and contraction, marked by incredible brutality to 
the Russian people, where millions died. Under Stalin, the Soviet Union 
exterminated more people than the German Nazis, including large numbers 
of Jews. They were to a degree successful but only under Stalin. The 
initial years prepared for him. His death saw the experiment, of 
another form of corrosive socialism, falter and lead into a new period 
of decay. Under Putin, a new experiment has begun where the drivers are 
the interests of organized crime, so perhaps little different from the 
Soviet period, sharing also much with the older history of Russia.

The author has used his extensive knowledge of the subject to produce 
a well-written expose that provides many provoking insights. The text 
is supported by a very interesting photo-plate section.