Race2Recovery, Beyond Injury, Achieving The Extraordinary

B1818

The author has provided a comprehensive glimpse of one group of survivors and their determination to return to a full life and to take on a challenge that is gruelling for anyone, being accepted by few. The story begins with facing life after a major injury. The part played in assisting recovery by Help For Heroes and the idea of Race2Recovery is explained. The author then works methodically through the key elements by providing a sketch of each team member, the competing vehicles, the support vehicles and the training. The stage is then set for the story of the Dakar race, the stresses on people and equipment, the attrition, and the final triumph of the crew that completed the race to achieve a podium position.

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NAME: Race2Recovery, Beyond Injury, Achieving The Extraordinary
CLASSIFICATION: Book Reviews
FILE: R1818
DATE: 090313
AUTHOR: Stephanie Temple
PUBLISHER: Haynes
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 193
PRICE: £17.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: British servicemen, US servicemen, Dakar Rally, desert race, endurance race, mountain race, Tedworth House, South America, Chile, Peru, Help The Heroes, Argentina, Afghanistan, amputee, medivac, SAR, Combat SAR, Land Rover Defender, Wildcat, Jackal
ISBN: 978-0-85733-380-3
IMAGE: B1818.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/c4a6w8v
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: Books can entertain,educate, influence, and inspire. This book does all of these things and inspires on so many levels. It tells the story of a team of British and US servicemen who had been injured and disabled, but decided to enter the toughest motorsport event in the world. The publisher has offered the book at a very competitive price, but also committed pay to £2.00 from every copy sold to the charities Help The Heroes and Race2Recovery.

Before World War Two, medical care of military wounded was limited to setting broken bones, removing metal fragments and bullets, and stitching wounds. In the field care was rudimentary and the survival rate was sadly low. Moving the wounded back from the battlefield was slow and painful. During World War Two, those casualties lucky enough to survive the evacuation to home hospitals benefited from a series of medical developments, including reconstructive surgery, treatment of severe burns and the first antibiotics. Until the Korean War, battlefield casualties could only by recovered from the field, in the main, on hand carried stretchers, after very basic attention with the application of field dressings. They might have to be transported then by road to emergency hospital facilities that would attempt to stabilize the wounds further to enable the wounded to be moved back to home hospitals. This meant that the period from suffering the wounds to full hospital care and recovery could take weeks and even months. The result was that many died from blood loss or infection because combat injuries frequently include dirt and other foreign material being driven into the wound, and there was no ability to provide blood transfusions or to restrict bleeding. For those who survived those major risks, shock was often a fatal consequence of serious wounds.

During the Korean War, medics in the field were being equipped with supplies an training, whilst the helicopter was routinely used to rapidly move the wounded to Mobile Army Surgical Hospitals that were close enough to sometimes experience incoming fire. As soon as the wounded had been stabilized, they were moved by helicopter to full hospital facilities and then flown home. Those who were already walking wounded might be moved by road and sea at a slower pace, but still a dramatic improvement on previous military medical support. In some cases, a seriously injured serviceman could be recovering in a fully-equipped hospital back home only days after being wounded. The result was that the survival rate of wounded military personnel dramatically improved. This then presented a new challenge because personnel, who would once have died painfully in the field, were now being moved rapidly to greatly improved medical facilities and making impressive recoveries, but suffering some form of disability, or requiring long-term care. For all of those who recovered and left hospital, there was the challenge of either returning to some form of military service, or forging a new life and overcoming any disability.

Although significant strides had been taken in triage, medical evacuation, and advanced procedures, it took society longer to adjust to the new realities. In recent years, after-treatment support has begun to catch up with the advances in treating military injuries. There have also been some impressive advances in the development of devices to replace body parts that were damaged beyond repair. Even so, recovery still depends heavily on the will and determination of the wounded and the support that is provided to assist them in coping with the end results of very serious injuries.

The author has provided a comprehensive glimpse of one group of survivors and their determination to return to a full life and to take on a challenge that is gruelling for anyone, being accepted by few. The story begins with facing life after a major injury. The part played in assisting recovery by Help For Heroes and the idea of Race2Recovery is explained. The author then works methodically through the key elements by providing a sketch of each team member, the competing vehicles, the support vehicles and the training. The stage is then set for the story of the Dakar race, the stresses on people and equipment, the attrition, and the final triumph of the crew that completed the race to achieve a podium position.

The publisher has given the author’s text the full treatment of a quality production with lavish full colour illustration, using some 400 outstanding photographs in the process.

By the end of the book, every reader will have gained a new insight into the trials and triumphs faced by those injured in the service of their country, that excellent work of those who provided treatment and developed new devices to help the wounded overcome the traumas they suffered, and the triumph of the achievement by medical and support staff and of those who survived and moved forward. The story of the race is a whole new range of achievement that brings great credit on all those involved. It is impossible not to be inspired by the stories told in this book.

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