Putin’s Virtual War, Russia’s Subversion and Conversion of America, Europe and the World Beyond

Putin was a lad from the slums who joined the KGB and, although his personal reviews were often very poor, he made it to the top and then onto President. The author has set out the dangers that Putin has brought to the world in a must-read book. – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Putin's Virtual War, Russia's Subversion and Conversion of America, Europe 
and the World Beyond
FILE: R3140
AUTHOR: William Nester
PUBLISHER: frontline books, Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £35.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:  Cold War, Russian Revolution, Soviet Union, USSR, KGB, GRU, KGB 
general, KGB Director, Putin, Russian Federation, FSB, cyber space, information 
warfare, information security, SIGINT, misinformation, propaganda, surveillance, IT 
vulnerability, communications vulnerability, electronic security, manipulation, social 
media, the Internet, misdirection

ISBN: 1-52677-118-7
PAGES: 354
IMAGE: B3140.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/quf7my9
DESCRIPTION: Putin was a lad from the slums who joined the KGB and, although 
his personal reviews were often very poor, he made it to the top and then onto 
President. The author has set out the dangers that Putin has brought to the world 
in a must-read book. – Most Highly Recommended.

The history of Putin's rise to power was remarkably rapid, all the more so when some 
of his assessment reports described him as lazy and incompetent. However, he did 
rise to the top of the KGB and is a product of that notorious organization. It should 
therefore be no surprise that he is using all the KGB play-book strategies and 
enhancing them with the great developments in communications and computing. 
What is not at all clear is who he owed his promotions to and who shaped the man 
of today, but also raises questions as to the degree to which he is solely responsible 
for shaping his actions now.

In the West, politicians hailed Glasnost and the fall of the USSR as the end of all 
wars and the opportunity indulge in a peace dividend spending spree. Many failed 
to understand that the old USSR was dead in name but not in tradition and motive. 
The KGB fought back and almost toppled the architect of Glasnost, leaving his 
wife terminally scared, but it failed for a number of reasons. One was that Yeltsin 
carried the breakup of the old Soviet Union through force of personality and failed 
to receive the support and guidance that the Western democracies could have 
provided at a critical point. Many assumed that all that was needed was to build a 
few MacDonalds in Russia and introduce the trapping of Western culture. They failed 
to understand Russia has a long history of leadership by strong individuals, ruthless 
suppression of opposition, and a slave culture applied to the mass of the population. 
Ivan the Terrible sent his Oprichnici out to terrorise the population and remove any 
potential rival with the greatest brutality. He was following a format established by 
the Czars who went before and he would be followed by generations that followed 
his lead. The Russian Revolution simply replaced him with new 'czars' who ruled 
with equal brutality and Putin is as much captive to a heritage as he is a new style 
'czar' who has adopted modern technology to the old traditions.

The author has presented a detailed picture of Putin and the threat he poses to all of 
his neighbours. Inevitably, new situations can emerge and the Chinese Wuhan-19 
Pandemic potentially changes the prospects for the future. It remains to be seen if 
these potentials will become game-changers, particularly in respect of Putin's grip on 
power at home. Behind Putin are power brokers, most of whom became very rich, 
kleptocrats and sponsors of kleptocrats. Almost overnight they stripped the best parts 
of the old USSR for their own personal gain and most of them were members of the 
KGB 'family', forming a ruthless new mafia. There are signs that Putin is losing their 
backing, although this could just lead on into a series of bloody purges that could 
leave Putin with an even tighter grip. If he falls, most of the dangers set out in this 
book will remain, just under new management.

The significant unknown will be what happens to China and that will be determined 
by how much anger has been stored up around the world as a result of the release of 
the Wuhan-19 pathogen and the attempts by the Chinese Government to conceal the 
huge dangers through delays in releasing information, lies and blatant propaganda. At 
the very least, the Chinese could see serious damage to their trading and political 
relationships, even to the point of seeing China retreat from the world stage as she has 
done several times in history.

However the post-Wuhan-19 world plays out, there may be little change to the 
warnings set out in this absorbing book. It is one of those must-read books.