Nelson’s Navy in 100 Objects

The in 100 Objects’ series is proving very popular, providing a fascinating look at a subject through a cross section of objects that define it. This new book in the series reads well and contains a very interesting selection of images that are almost entirely provided in full colour through the body of the book Very Highly Recommended

NAME:  Nelson’s Navy in 100 Objects
FILE: R3371
AUTHOR: Gareth Glover
PUBLISHER: Frontline Books, Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                              
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   Nelson, Admiralty, ships, battleships, ports, home ports, supplies, press 
gangs, sailors, officers, meritocracy, equipment, naval architecture, construction, 
repairs, medical services
 
ISBN: 1-52673-132-0

PAGES: 132,  more than 200 images, mostly in full colour with some B&W images
IMAGE: B3371.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/2e3fn943
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The in 100 Objects’ series is proving very popular, providing a 
fascinating look at a subject through a cross section of objects that define it. This 
new book in the series reads well and contains a very interesting selection of 
images that are almost entirely provided in full colour through the body of the 
book   Very Highly Recommended

The scale of the Royal Navy at the time of Nelson is a great surprise to many readers, when the modern RN could almost be outnumbered on the Serpentine, and at the time of this review is about to lose yet another of the dwindling number of frigates. At the time of Nelson the full fleet strength was some 1,000 warships and included 100 First Rate Line of Battleships. From the 100 gun battleships, that actually mounted more than 100 guns, to the smallest fast packets, with a very limited armament, the Royal Navy included a very wide range of sizes and shapes and rigs. That, however, was a small part of the capabilities of the RN. There were many home ports, with Chatham and Portsmouth providing all of the support facilities for a major fleet, smaller ports around the British Isles that provided facilities as needed. There were shipyards that built and fitted out the warships and depots that held supplies to be forwarded on to the ships as required.

Outside the British Isles, there were permanent port facilities, particularly in the Mediterranean and Caribbean. The press gangs were active in finding new ‘recruits’ and ships and ports had medical facilities to cope with the injuries of battle and the effects of infections. It was a huge operation.

The author has provided a very comprehensive coverage of all of the aspects of naval life and the ships within the limits of 100 defining objects. Once again this is an innovative series that provides a few surprises and should appeal to a wide audience, well beyond the naval history enthusiasts. The quality of the images and the gloss paper on which they are printed is first rate.