Napoleon’s Waterloo Army, Uniforms and Equipment

This is the third volume of a series, this volume covering Napoleon’s Army assembled to face the Allied Army at Waterloo. The uniforms and equipment of the Regiments are beautifully illustrated with images in the form of coloured drawings and photographs of museum exhibits – Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Napoleon's Waterloo Army, Uniforms and Equipment
FILE: R3034
AUTHOR: Paul L Dawson
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, frontline books
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £40.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Napoleonic Wars, Imperial Guard, cavalry, mounted force, equipment, 
weapons, uniform, elite force, Chasseurs a Cheval, Mamelukes, clothing, training, 
deployment, tactics, infantry, artillery, Grey Moustaches, Waterloo, Wellington

ISBN: 978-1-52670-528-0

IMAGE: B3034.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y4hnxqxv
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: This is the third volume of a series, this volume covering Napoleon's 
Army assembled to face the Allied Army at Waterloo. The uniforms and equipment 
of the Regiments are beautifully illustrated with images in the form of coloured 
drawings and photographs of museum exhibits – Highly Recommended.

The defeat of Napoleon resulted in a Peace that was based on replacing him with Louis XVI as the ruler of France. Napoleon asked to be allowed to continue as Emperor and his exile to Elba meant that he either accepted his fate, or returned to France to raise a new army. Returning to France was not a real challenge, raising an new army was more difficult, but the major challenge was in defeating the armies potentially standing against him. He decided to go for the Allied Armies in Belgium under the command of Wellington, believing that they were the weakest of the forces against him. He hoped that a defeat of this force would prevent the main Prussian Army under Blucher and the Austrian Army from linking with the armies under Wellington and presenting an overwhelming force against the French.

History records that his gamble failed, his army was broken and he fled the field. However, he had achieved amazing success in raising the new Army and getting it to Belgium, but this is largely overlooked, as are the uniforms and equipment of that Army. This is perhaps inevitable because his defeat at Waterloo was what captured the imagination and the focus of historians, making this fine lavishly illustrated book all the more welcome.

As with the two volumes on the Imperial Guard, this book contains many rare and previously unpublished images in the form of full colour drawings and photographs of surviving relics. As with the earlier volumes, this book will appeal to and be enjoyed by a wide readership with special interest for historians, military history enthusiasts, Napoleonic War enthusiasts and re-enactors.