Napoleon’s Imperial Guard, Uniforms and Equipment, The Infantry

All countries maintain elite troops of some form and the Imperial Guard formed Napoleon’s elite troops, directly winning many battles and, at Waterloo, marking his defeat when they were forced back by the British. This book is packed with information and insight. It includes many illustrations and of these many are in full colour – Most Highly Recommended

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NAME: Napoleon's Imperial Guard, Uniforms and Equipment, The Infantry
FILE: R2946
AUTHOR: Paul L Dawson
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword, frontline
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 475
PRICE: £40.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Napoleonic Wars, Battle of Waterloo, shock troops, elite troops, battle 
honours, dress, weapons, accoutrements, equipment, organization, tactics, battle line

ISBN: 1-52670-191-X

IMAGE: B2946.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yxggp7g9
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: All countries maintain elite troops of some form and the Imperial 
Guard formed Napoleon's elite troops, directly winning many battles and, at 
Waterloo, marking his defeat when they were forced back by the British. This book 
is packed with information and insight. It includes many illustrations and of 
these many are in full colour  –   Most Highly Recommended

In starting to review a book from Pen & Sword and its imprints, it would be a 
disappointment to find any less than excellent. Sometimes there is a gulp at the 
price, but once the reviewer opens the book and starts through the pages it soon 
becomes obvious that the price is always aggressive, even before considering the 
various special offers where some handsome discounts are available. This book is 
firmly there. There is considerable information within its pages and the level of 
illustration is exemplary The number of illustrations in full colour is surprising and 
in some respects this could be regarded as a work of art. Many of these illustrations 
have been published for the first time and include colour photographs of items of 
equipment. There are also many reproductions of paintings of Imperial Guards in 
various dress, providing a level of detail never achieved before in the many books 
on the Imperial Guard that have appeared over the years.

As the FIRE Project team completes some major engineering work on our on-line 
presentation for news and information, we are in the process of re-introducing book 
reviews from our earliest databases. This is time consuming and, as a team of 
volunteers, there are always many demands on available volunteer hours, so that this 
may prove a lengthy exercise. By coincidence, the work has recently included 
putting several reviews into our current standard format that include what at the time 
were outstanding works on the Imperial Guard. It is interesting to compare them and 
see how very good this new book is.

Of course the Imperial Guard did not leap fully formed from Napoleon's imagination. 
Directly, it evolved from the Consular Guard of the French Republic. This elite 
corps had in turn evolved from the elite units of the French Army before the French 
Revolution. Napoleon developed the original traditions of French elite troops into 
an all-arms formation of almost 100,000 men and from them drew the members of
 his personal bodyguard in much the same way that the British Monarchy formed its 
Household Division from elite units that included the Blues and Royals, and where 
the Prussian Kaisers formed their Household Division from the elite Prussian forces, 
including the Ulans which were lancers and formed the close protect squad for the 
Kaiser.

This magnificent volume covers the Imperial Guard Infantry and Foot Artillery. In 
their distinctive uniforms they were an impressive formation that were held as the 
principle tactical reserve, committed to battle sparingly and at the crucial parts of the 
battle. That gave them a reputation for being the shock troops that were unbeatable, 
making the shock of their repulse at Waterloo, by the British tactical reserve, the 
defining point of the engagement and the signal for the start of the rout of the French 
Army.