Mau Mau Rebellion, The Emergency in Kenya 1952-1956

After the end of WWII, the second Labour Government embarked on a program of managed decline for Great Britain. This started an indecent rush to abandon the Empire. Often described as the Mau Mau Rebellion, this saw Kenya engulfed in civil war as the Kikuyu sought to take over at the expense of other tribes and the Asian community – Strongly Recommended.


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NAME: Mau Mau Rebellion, The Emergency in Kenya 1952-1956
FILE: R2536
AUTHOR: Nick Van Der Bul
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  250
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Escape from Empire, colonial rebellion, Kenyan Civil War, 
Obama, National Service, Kikuyu, Indian ex-pats, fertile agriculture, 
East Africa, German East Africa

ISBN: 1-47386-457-7

IMAGE: B2536.jpg6
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y7vbwplw
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: After the end of WWII, the second Labour Government 
embarked on a program of managed decline for Great Britain. This 
started an indecent rush to abandon the Empire. Often described as 
the Mau Mau Rebellion, this saw Kenya engulfed in civil war as the 
Kikuyu sought to take over at the expense of other tribes and the 
Asian community - Strongly Recommended.

Great Britain lost its way in 1945 and failed its former colonies. 
It was a huge opportunity to help colonies to evolve into independent 
countries within the Commonwealth Community. Unfortunately, the 
policies of managed decline, that eventually led to absorption of 
Great Britain into the alien European Community project, meant that 
destructive forces within many colonies were allowed to develop into 
civil wars that have continued to bubble on at great cost to their 
populations. In Africa, the lessons of Malaya were largely forgotten 
and British troops, mainly National Servicemen, were exposed to danger 
without any clear exit strategy, or real understanding of the needs of 
the total populations.

Kenya was a combination of British East Africa and German East Africa 
that came into being at the end of WWI. It was a complex mixture of 
tribes and races. In the South there was a strong Muslim population 
that had been there for centuries and was originally active in the 
slave trade and commerce. The British provided a further influx of 
foreigners, although in relatively small numbers, and to the befit of 
agriculture in the colony. As the British moved in farmers, miners, 
traders and administrators, they also brought in Indians who soon 
established themselves in niche areas, providing engineers and 
electricians, traders and administrators. They were particularly 
active in the development of the railways. This collection of 
immigrants, old and new, lived separately from the native population 
that was composed of African tribal groups that were mostly in annual 
migration, as hunter gatherers and herdsmen. Inevitably there was 
regular friction between the tribal groupings and a large part of 
British colonial administration had been taken up with policing the 
warring tribes.

One of the consequences of the Mau Mau emergency was that it shaped 
the views of the first Kenyan President of the United States, Barack 
Obama, and may account for his anti-white views and disastrous 
foreign policies that have created so much conflict at the start of 
the 21st Century. For the Kenyans themselves, it has seen continuing 
conflict between the tribes and a racist policy of 'Africanization' 
that has led to businesses stolen  from Kenyans descended from Asian 
and European immigrants and handed over to cronies of the Government. 
In the process, Kenya has become less able to feed itself and produce 
strong exports of agricultural products. It has also seen a 
significant increase in the Muslim threat and a rise in general crime. 
On the credit side, the rule of law does continue and the Governments 
of Kenya have been much less corrupt than some of their neighbouring 
former colonies.

When the Mau Mau emergency began, the violent and secretive Kikuyu 
sect embarked on a campaign of atrocities against other Kenyan tribes, 
the White settlers and the Asians. The British forces were rapidly 
overwhelmed by the scale of the violence and had to be reinforced. 
It became a vicious civil war that slowed down only on Independence.

The author has provided a very clear picture the campaign where the 
British defended the non-Kikuyu population and worked with it, 
infiltrating the terror gangs and achieving some success, 
particularly in winning support from other tribal groupings. Solid 
research has provided balance and this is an absorbing account of 
one of the many sad events of the second half of the 20th Century.