Liverpool Pals, 17th 18th 19th 20th The (Service) Battalions The King’s Liverpool Regiment

B2238

This is a nicely executed book that brings to life the Liverpool PALS. The text is crisp and the images are carried through the body of the book to produce an emotive picture of one of the joys and sorrows of WWI. All enthusiasts of the Great War will want to buy a copy, and it should sell very well in Liverpool, but it is a book that reaches out from the mud of Flanders with an engrossing human story. Recommended.

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NAME: Liverpool Pals, 17th 18th 19th 20th The (Service) Battalions The King’s Liverpool Regiment
DATE: 151115
FILE: R2238
AUTHOR: Graham Maddocks
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 288
PRICE: £16.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: The Great War, WWI, World War One, First World War, Flanders, Western Front, Somme, Passchendale, Arras, Russian intervention force
ISBN: 1-47384-512-2
IMAGE: B2238.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/hkp5ftm
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This is a nicely executed book that brings to life the Liverpool PALS. The text is crisp and the images are carried through the body of the book to produce an emotive picture of one of the joys and sorrows of WWI. All enthusiasts of the Great War will want to buy a copy, and it should sell very well in Liverpool, but it is a book that reaches out from the mud of Flanders with an engrossing human story. Recommended.

The author has researched thoroughly and included a good bibliography, making this a valuable reference book of an important aspect of the British Expeditionary Force that performed so effectively and courageously against great numbers of German formations.

One of the factors of the BEF was the formation of PALS battalions. Men volunteered from the same streets. Most knew each other as neighbours and members of the same families. Coming from close knit communities, the PALS denuded their communities of men of military age and included those who lied about their age to be accepted both younger and older than the official military age. Sadly, so many lost their lives in the meat grinder of the Western Front that their communities never recovered after the war. That level of sacrifice is difficult to fully comprehend in the 21st Century. The hundred years that have elapsed could as easily be a millennium, the world having changed so much.

Knowing comrades so closely was good and bad, loss being felt all the more keenly, but there was also a unique comradeship that provided comfort in a living hell.

The 17th Battalion of the Liverpool PALS were to fight on in Russia after most of the British Army returned home to peace. From 1917, Army and Royal Navy personnel were sent to Russia to fight alongside the White Russians on a number of fronts. This is part of history that has never been well documented and reviewed. For the 17th Battalion, their Russian adventure was to last for eleven months, while other units and individuals fought on longer without recognition in a brutal war.

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