Liberty’s Provenance, The Evolution of the Liberty Ship from its Sunderland Origins

The Liberty Ship was one of a handful of war winning developments. This class of ship is often thought of as American but the author sets out her provenance – Very Highly Recommended

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NAME: Liberty's Provenance, The Evolution of the Liberty Ship from its Sunderland 
Origins
FILE: R2941
AUTHOR: John Henshaw
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword, Seaforth Publishing
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 128
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War Two, World War 2, World War II, WWII, Second World War, 
merchant marine, cargo ships, convoys, ship losses, Liberty Ship, emergency build 
program,

ISBN: 978-1-5267-5063-1

IMAGE: B2941.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y2wb6xfn
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: The Liberty Ship was one of a handful of war winning 
developments. This class of ship is often thought of as American but the author 
sets out her provenance –   Very Highly Recommended

The British faced a number of major challenges in the early part of WWII. The war 
at sea was resulting in heavy loss of merchant ships for a nation that imported most 
raw materials and food. At the same time, all of the British shipyards were easily 
identified from the air and with in the range of German bombers. That meant that 
the British Purchasing Commission in the US had to find US shipyards to take on 
the task of the emergency building program to keep up and get ahead of the shipping 
losses. The US yards did not have to worry about air raids and they had already 
been adopting mass production and hull welding to significantly increase output.

The Liberty Ship was not the only joint development project. The P-45 Mustang was 
another example of combining British battle experience and technology to produce 
something outstanding. In the case of the Liberty ship, British design of Emergency 
Ships had begun during WWI. Joseph L Thompson & Sons Ltd., of North Sands, 
Sunderland had been a leading yard building fine merchant ships in an area that had 
been building ships since the Middle Ages. They had produced the Dorington Court 
Class as a standard emergency build class.

Henry J Kaiser was quick to seize the opportunity of an order from the British 
Shipbuilding Mission for sixty ships. These ships were to be based on the Dorington 
Court Class. They were to become a vital part of the Allied war effort, built very 
quickly and to form the basis of large scale rapid construction with modifications to 
meet changes in need.

Although conceived as emergency ships to meet the relatively short life of the war, 
Liberty ships were used long after WWII by merchant marine and military users. The 
author has provided a very complete story of these important ships and his able text 
is supported by many illustrations, including some of his excellent line drawings.