Last Stand at Zandvoorde 1914, Lord Hugh Grosvenor’s Noble Sacrifice

Produced using unpublished letters home and contemporary accounts, 
the author has written an excellent account of Lord Hugh Grosvenor 
and his action at Zandvoorde. There are many rare and well-chosen 
images, maps and photographs to support the text. First Class Account.


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NAME: Last Stand at Zandvoorde 1914, Lord Hugh Grosvenor's Noble 
Sacrifice
FILE: R2420
AUTHOR:  Mike McBride
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  234
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War 1, World War I, First World War, BEF, 
rearguard, fighting retreat, German Army
ISBN: 1-47389-157-4
IMAGE: B2420.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/hqo3qta
LINKS: Current Discount Offers http://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/sale 
DESCRIPTION: Produced using unpublished letters home and contemporary 
accounts, the author has written an excellent account of Lord Hugh 
Grosvenor and his action at Zandvoorde. There are many rare and well-
chosen images, maps and photographs to support the text. 
First Class Account.

Lord Hugh Grosvenor was the son of the Duke of Westminster, of a 
family that traces back to 1066 and has produced many courageous 
warriors. At Zandvoorde, Lord Hugh was demonstrating the finest 
qualities of the soldier and the mystery is that his body, and that 
of 100 soldiers were never found.

Britain had a small but very professional standing army which was 
used to create the British Expeditionary Force. The BEF arrived in 
France with totally inadequate numbers to face the German invasion 
of Belgium. The Germans dismissed the BEF as a Contemptable Little 
Army and then found to their horror just how effective it was. The 
BEF fought with such ferocity that the Germans came up against 
companies and smaller units but thought they had encountered the 
main force. 

Inevitably, the BEF was forced back but blunted the German advance 
and frustrated their plans for a lighting war and rapid occupation 
of France. It was also inevitable that many units of the BEF were 
annihilated by vastly superior numbers.

As units fought a valiant rearguard action, they fell back in good 
order and rejoined neighbouring units. As the Germans were slowed 
and halted, both armies began to dig in and the trench warfare that 
was to cost so many lives was begun.

This is a dramatic story and merited a dramatic account by the author, 
of one of the example actions at Zandvoorde. It shows how the cavalry 
tactics reached a turning point in the face of new weapons technology. 
It is a very personal story of courage and self-sacrifice that is a 
beacon in history.