Invasion ’44, The Full Story of D-Day

Invassion44

The author has provided a fine account of one of the greatest events in military history. He has 
carefully researched and graphically told an incredible story, producing what is the clearest and 
most comprehensive account on the dramatic landings.
The author has managed to capture the challenges and the solutions that made a successful 
landing possible. There are essential maps and a photo plate section to reinforce the text. With 
all of the books that have been written about the D-Day landings, this provides essential reading 
in covering the preparations and the landings. It reads very well and leads the reader through 
the stages in a logical manner.
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NAME: Invasion '44, The Full Story of D-Day
CATEGORY: Book Reviews
DATE: 180514
FILE: R1971
AUTHOR: John Frayn Turner
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  198
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: amphibious assault, airborne assault, Atlantic Wall, Normandy, D-Day, WWII, 
World War Two, Second World War, 1939-1945
ISBN: 1-78303-298-7
IMAGE: B1971.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/kmjskjz
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: The author has provided a fine account of one of the greatest events in 
military history. He has carefully researched and graphically told an incredible story, 
producing what is the clearest and most comprehensive account on the dramatic landings.

Even many of those who took part in the landings would not have had a full appreciation 
of the unfolding event. Each had to focus on the tasks assigned to his unit within the grand 
plan. There was an appreciation of the scale of what was happening, but the beaches 
stretched away from the place where each boat landed its cargo and the battle extended 
inland to the airborne troops who had been landed on key points to prevent the Germans 
reinforcing their defences and to hold bridges that would be needed for the break out from 
the beaches.

For those who were not at the beaches, the sheer scale of the landings is difficult to fully 
appreciate. Without landing on the mainland and fighting into Germany, total victory would 
never have been possible and some form of armistice would have been the best available 
end to the fighting. That would only have postponed further war for perhaps a very short 
period. A successful landing was that vital, but the challenges it presented were enormous. 
No one had ever planned a military action on this scale before. The first twenty four hours 
#would be critical. If the troops could not fight their way off the beaches within that time, 
they would be driven back into the sea.

The thousands of vessels collected together to transport the invading army and provide 
shore bombardment included many types which had been created for these landings. In 
almost every respect, new ways of training, moving, arming and landing the force had to 
be developed. British planning had begun before the evacuation of British and French troops 
from Dunkirk in 1940. When the US entered the war, planning for a landing in France 
accelerated, but there were many tasks that had to be achieved before the final planning 
could begin. The landings at Dieppe were a large reconnaissance in force to test ideas and 
German defences. It ended with very heavy casualties.

The Allies had to convince the Germans that the real attack was to be launched at Calais as 
the shortest journey, while the landings would take place elsewhere. That involved an 
incredible intelligence operation to deceive the Germans. Britain became one huge armed 
camp as equipment and men were collected from around the world. Just moving those 
numbers across the Channel was an immense task, even before considering the defence that 
the Germans could be expected to put up. Once ashore, the troops would require a steady 
flow of supplies on an enormous scale. Selecting the open beaches of Normandy provided 
the best prospects against the German defences, but it created an incredible problem in landing 
supplies, fuel and ammunition. The brilliant solution was to build large pre-fabricated harbours 
that had to be towed across the channel and assembled on the beaches. That would allow 
merchant ships to bring across vehicles, men and all the supplies for the first phase. PLUTO 
was an underwater pipeline that could pump fuel for the thousands of thirsty vehicles. 
Everything had to be done on a grand scale but it also needed a multitude of inventions.

The author has managed to capture the challenges and the solutions that made a successful 
landing possible. There are essential maps and a photo plate section to reinforce the text. 
With all of the books that have been written about the D-Day landings, this provides essential 
reading in covering the preparations and the landings. It reads very well and leads the reader 
through the stages in a logical manner.