Instruments of Darkness, The History of Electronic Warfare 1939-1945

For six years, Britain and Germany fought a bitter aerial war at huge cost in terms of lives lost and aircraft shot down. This book traces effectively the largely hidden battle in the first widespread use of electronic warfare. Supported by some excellent images. Most Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Instruments of Darkness, The History of Electronic Warfare 
1939-1945
FILE: R2476
AUTHOR: Alfred Price
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, frontline
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES:  272
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Air war, carpet bombing, night fighters, Bomber Command, 
WWII, World War 2, World War Two, Europe, blitz, electronic warfare, 
ELINT, radar, radio, direction finding, radio guidance

ISBN: 1-47389-564-2

IMAGE: B2476.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/mfeldce
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: For six years, Britain and Germany fought a bitter 
aerial war at huge cost in terms of lives lost and aircraft shot down.  
This book traces effectively the largely hidden battle in the first 
widespread use of electronic warfare. Supported by some excellent 
images. Most Highly Recommended. 

The Royal Navy pioneered electronic warfare during WWI. It 
established radio monitoring stations around the world with the 
ability to not only listen in to enemy radio traffic, but also use 
the stations to triangulate on an enemy transmitter to find its 
location. The reason that the Royal Navy was the pioneer was that it 
had invested heavily in equipping its warships with radio and 
understood its advantage and potential weakness. Finding ways to 
exploit weakness in enemy radio was a logical next step. At the time, 
the size of radio equipment, its weight, and the amount of wire required 
for an antenna, meant that it was difficult to deploy outside warships 
and fixed ground stations. As WWI progressed, radio development made 
it practical to equip aircraft and the Royal Navy had a wider air mission 
than the Army's RFC, making radio more important to link aircraft 
escorting convoys and searching for enemy ships, ground stations and 
friendly warships.

After WWI, the development of electronics was starting to speed up. By the 
start of WWII, radio was used by military vehicles, especially tanks, 
warships, land forces and air forces. It was to become the war where 
electronic warfare came of age.

This new form of warfare was very secret and had enormous impact on the 
conduct and outcome of the war. For aircraft, the use of radio for 
communications and for navigation became critical. The use of radar and 
command and control became critical to air defence, and radar was to 
become an effective bombing aid. That increasing dependence of radio-
based electronics was to spur  the use of encryption to hide content 
from the enemy, code breaking to unmask the content that had been 
encrypted, and computers to provide the means to process the huge 
amounts of electronic intelligence being collected. It was also 
important to develop methods of jamming enemy transmissions, 
particularly radar through the use of 'window'.

The author has been able to use information only recently de-
classified and has presented a very broad picture of the very secret 
electronic war that was previously difficult to produce from then 
available information.