Images of War, With Rommel in the Desert, Tripoli to El Alamein, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

This addition to the very popular Images of War series is another well-researched and well-presented book and very good value. – Rommel was perhaps the most effective German General and certainly the most respected by the British – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Images of War, With Rommel in the Desert, Tripoli to El 
Alamein, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives
FILE: R2555
AUTHOR: David Litchelhill-Green
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES:  216
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War 2, World War II, Second World War., German 
armour, AFV, Armoured Fighting Vehicle, tank, assault gun, German 
Army, Blitz Krieg, Afrika Korps, North Africa

ISBN: 1-47387-875-6

IMAGE: B2555.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y73ppww3
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: This addition to the very popular Images of War series 
is another well-researched and well-presented book and very good 
value.  - Rommel was perhaps the most effective German General and 
certainly the most respected by the British – Highly Recommended.

Rommel fully understood and implemented the theories of Blitz Krieg. 
He was there for the invasion of Poland, led the attack through 
neutral Belgium and into France with the advanced units of his 21st 
Panzer Division reaching Calais. He was the natural choice to lead 
a German Expeditionary Force in North Africa to save the Italians 
from destruction. The landings in Normandy might have produced a 
different result, had Rommel been free to follow his instinct to 
move his armour closer to the beaches before the invasion and 
concentrate more resources on defending that piece of coast. However, 
he was not without his flaws and limitations, acquiring a layer of 
myth and legend that obscures his real legacy.

The author has provided very readable text in support of a fine 
selection of rare images in what is one of the larger books in this 
well-received series. He has followed the Afrika Korps from its 
arrival in North Afrika through to Rommel's departure in March 1943.

Rommel never had a great force of armour, but he was leading a very 
experienced Panzer Army that was equipped with the best tanks and 
personnel carriers available to the Germans. Against him were British 
Generals who were constantly seeing vital resources diverted to 
Greece or some other fire-fighting operation. It has to also be said 
that some of the British Generals were not the most suitable to the 
task and Churchill's frustration was evidenced by frequent sackings. 
Fortunes changed when Montgomery was given the task of fighting 
Rommel, but although he brought a fresh and aggressive flavour to 
the 8th Army, his success at El Alamein owed at least as much to two 
factors that had little to do with Montgomery. Firstly, he had 
inherited some good planning and a formidable stock of new resources, 
including many Sherman tanks. Secondly, Rommel was not understood. 
His victories had been down to the unexpected but as the standard 
tactic was to get around the enemy's flank by driving South into the 
desert, it only took some brighter British officers to realize that 
the surprise was a repeat of earlier surprises. At El Alamein, the 
Great Depression and the Mediterranean coast formed hard barriers 
that prevented a flanking move. Where Rommel tried to get around the 
southern edge of the flank, he was expected and repulsed. From there 
it became a battle of resources. The Germans were losing tanks they 
could not replace and the British advances were too rapid to allow 
damaged tanks to be recovered. The Germans had a long supply line 
and the British had prepared to maintain supplies as their line 
lengthened. Fast patrol craft, submarines and aircraft from Malta 
continually disrupted Rommel's supply convoys from Italy, and the 
Allies Desert Air Force achieved air superiority, harried the 
retreating Germans and attacked deep behind enemy positions. The 
Torch landings created a second front and left Rommel nowhere to 
go except home.