Images of War, The Few, Fight for the Skies, rare photographs from wartime archives

B2255

Part of a well-established series of heavily illustrated books that depend on the rare photographs that have been reproduced in their pages. The author has covered The Few but also provided illustration and information on German pilots, tactics and the Blitz as well as the Battle of Britain. Recommended.

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NAME: Images of War, The Few, Fight for the Skies, rare photographs from wartime archives
FILE: R2255
AUTHOR: Philip Kaplan
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 144
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, Second World War, technology, tactics, war in the air, German aircraft British aircraft, aircrew, 1940, Blitz, Battle of Britain, air supremacy.
ISBN: 1-78346-302-3
IMAGE: B2255.jpg
BUYNOW:
LINKS: http://tinyurl.com/hj6298o
DESCRIPTION: Part of a well-established series of heavily illustrated books that depend on the rare photographs that have been reproduced in their pages. The author has covered The Few but also provided illustration and information on German pilots, tactics and the Blitz as well as the Battle of Britain. Recommended.

The Battle of Britain produced its share of myths but however historians may now attempt to offer alternative views, the RAF managed to achieve victory with a very small number of pilots, including those of many nationalities. The Germans had a considerable advantage in numbers of aircraft and the RAF was fighting a continuous battle to repair damaged aircraft, produce new aircraft, and, critically, to find the pilots to fly what was available. The command and control system, with its Chain Home radar stations was an outstanding success.

Victory is often difficult to describe because it is an illusive concept. The RAF contained the German attacks and achieved a high kill rate but that was subjective because the German advantage in numbers required RAF fighter pilots to shoot down five German aircraft for every RAF loss just to maintain the percentages. The Germans stopped their attacks and the RAF ruled British skies, to produce a credible claim of victory. In the final weeks, the Germans were beginning to shoot down more RAF aircraft in proportion and could claim to be winning, but the invasion of Russia denied them the numbers of aircraft they needed to turn their prospects around. In the final analysis it has to be a case of what happened, rather than what might have happened, and the reality was that the RAF held the field and the Germans were never able to invade Britain – the Battle was won by the RAF.

This book provides some powerful images and will add to any private library. A worthy addition to the Images of War series

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