Images of War, The Fall of Malaya and Singapore, Rare Photographs from Wartime Archives

B2262

This photo essay produces a very effective picture of the defeat of British forces in Malaya and Singapore by the Japanese. This volume features the usual outstanding selection of photographs, but also provides a higher percentage of text. Highly recommended.

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NAME: Images of War, The Fall of Malaya and Singapore, Rare Photographs from Wartime Archives
FILE: R2262
AUTHOR: Jon Diamond
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 208
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: The Far East War, Japanese invasions, the Forgotten War, soft targets, technical, equipment, tactics, WWI, World War Two, Second World War
ISBN: 1-78346-325-2
IMAGE: B2262.jpg
BUYNOW:
LINKS: http://tinyurl.com/hzpjpdo
DESCRIPTION: This photo essay produces a very effective picture of the defeat of British forces in Malaya and Singapore by the Japanese. This volume features the usual outstanding selection of photographs, but also provides a higher percentage of text. Highly recommended.

Japan gambled on a fast short war from, which it could negotiate more favourable terms for access to raw materials and fuel. As with Germany, the early stages of invasion suggested that the plan was working as expected. All of the early reverses suffered in Europe, North Africa and the Pacific were painful for the Allies, but they inevitably held and then reversed the early losses, as the manufacturing power of the US and Britain, and access to the world’s resources in materials and fuel, enabled them to out produce war materials and swing onto the offensive.

For the British, the demands of other theatres had resulted in the Far East being denied the resources required. Obsolete and obsolescent equipment was available in inadequate numbers. The situation was made worse by over-confidence in the effectiveness of defences. Singapore in particular was considered secure when the guns were mostly pointing out to sea and unable to cover the inland areas where the Japanese were advancing.

The loss of HMS Repulse and HMS Prince of Wales was one example where effective units were sent to the Far East, but without the necessary air cover and escort screens, resulting in the loss of two valuable vessels for no advantage.

There is a very good selection of images and informative text in their support. This photo essay will appeal to all those with interests in the greatest global conflict.

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