Images of War, The Eighth Army In North Africa, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

A new addition to the very popular Images of War series, covering the British Eighth Army in North Africa. The North African Campaigns were war of movement as armour travelled fast in advance, only to run short of supplies and be forced into retreat. – Highly Recommended

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

NAME: Images of War, The Eighth Army In North Africa, Rare Photographs From 
Wartime Archives
FILE: R2858
AUTHOR: Simon Forty
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES: 144
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War 2, World War II, WWII, Second World War, North Africa, 
Eighth Army, Afrika Korps, Italian Army, Mediterranean, armour, weapons race, air 
power, supply convoys, lines of communication

ISBN: 1-52672-379-4

IMAGE: B2858.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yxc59ve2
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: A new addition to the very popular Images of War series, 
covering the British Eighth Army in North Africa. The North African 
Campaigns were war of movement as armour travelled fast in advance, only 
to run short of supplies and be forced into retreat. – Highly Recommended

The terrain along the Mediterranean coast of North Africa provided a narrow strip 
of roads between Algeria and Egypt. The prize for the Germans was the Suez Canal. 
They had to advance fast enough to reach that target to win. For the Allies, British 
forces had to advance across into Algeria in a pincer movement with troops landing 
to West, capturing the German and Italian forces. Critical to the process for the Allies 
was for the Eight Army to halt the Germans and then chase them back up the coast.

This book provides a vivid insight into the British Eight Army in action as it defeated 
the Germans and Italians. In many respects desert warfare was more like naval 
warfare as armour fought armour in the vast open areas of the desert, where the 
desert was as much the enemy for both sides as their own conflict. This produced a 
very different relationship between combatants than was experienced in other theatres 
of war.