Images of War – The Battle For Warsaw 1939-1945, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

A new book from the very popular Images of War series. Many will think of the Battle for Warsaw as the rising in August 1944, this book shows graphically the battle from before the formal start of WWII until its end. – Highly Recommended.

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

http://ftnews.firetrench.com

NAME:   Images of War – The Battle For Warsaw 1939-1945, Rare Photographs 
From Wartime Archives
FILE: R3174
AUTHOR: Anthony Tucker-Jones
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword 
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £14.99                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   WWII, World War II, World War 2, World War Two, Second World War, 
war in Europe, European Theatre, Poland, Germany, Soviet Union, Polish Home 
Army, terror bombing, Warsaw Ghetto, Red Army, Liberation, retribution, Germany 
Army

ISBN: 1-52674-150-4

PAGES: 119
IMAGE: B3174.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y8k39fva
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: A new book from the very popular Images of War series. Many will 
think of the Battle for Warsaw as the rising in August 1944, this book shows 
graphically the battle from before the formal start of WWII until its end. – 
Highly Recommended.


Once again, a very effective selection of rare images and concise descriptive text as we have come to expect of this series of books.

The German attack on Poland triggered WWII, making the battle for Poland and Warsaw a pre-cursor of the second global industrial war. In war, surrender usually means the end of the battle but Poland was unprepared to cease fighting and the Germans had only just started. The declaration of war on Germany by Britain and France, when German refused to cease its invasion of Poland, was of little direct assistance for the Poles. The pact between the Soviet Union and Germany meant that Poland could not resist the invaders for very long. Although formal military resistance was limited by resources and the inability of Allies to reach Poland, the resistance was already being planned.

The occupation of Poland by the Russians was every bit as brutal as the German occupation in the Western part of Poland. German death squads were already roaming the captured area while the segregation and eventual killing of most of Poland’s Jews was well underway.

The images in this book and the text graphically recount the phases of the Battle for Warsaw from the very beginning. Much of this period has been seriously neglected by historians. The book goes on to provide an equally graphic account of the later phases when the Polish Army was instructed to rise against the Germans who by then had swept through the Soviet occupied zone and on into Russia. As the Soviet Red Army drove the Germans out of Russia and into Poland, the Poles reasonably expected a full Soviet support for their rising in Warsaw. Stalin decided to wait and let the Germans destroy the Polish Home Army to simplify the full occupation of Poland by the Soviets and the moving of the country westwards to place its eastern areas directly inside the Soviet Union.