Images of War, SS Specialist Units In Combat, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

This is an addition to the established and very popular Images of War series. The SS have received a great deal of coverage from historians although much of that coverage has concentrated on the many war crimes committed by SS personnel. This new book completes a comprehensive IoW series coverage of the SS. Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Images of War, SS Specialist Units In Combat, Rare Photographs From 
Wartime Archives
FILE: R2716
AUTHOR: Bob Carruthers
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES: 160
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, Second World War, WW2, World War Two,
Germany, Nazi, SS, Himmler, Dietrich, Hauser, paratroopers, cavalry, signallers, 
engineers, bakers, medics, mountain troops, special forces

ISBN: 1-47386-848-3

IMAGE: B2716.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y7gzjt2g
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:  This is an addition to the established and very popular Images of 
War series. The SS have received a great deal of coverage from historians although 
much of that coverage has concentrated on the many war crimes committed by 
SS personnel. This new book completes a comprehensive IoW series coverage of 
the SS. Highly Recommended.

The FIRE Project Reviews often receives email questions from our readers and one that periodically 
comes up is: “Where does the Images of War series fit in for military history enthusiasts. Its a very 
good question but much depends on individual readers. The cost of adding illustration to military 
history books usually results in very economic use of images. The IoW series has become very popular 
because it provides a great many images of war with some concise text in introduction and in captions. 
Not only does it provide visual information, but it includes a great many very rare images that have 
never been used in general publishing. For the military professional and the experienced military
 enthusiast, the IoW series very nicely complements an existing personal library, providing images 
that the other books failed to include in their small photo-plate sections and where those using many 
more images by embedding images through a text have had to produced at small size and sometimes 
at poor definition. By usually setting one or two images per page in a near A4 book, IoW provides 
large and clear images that convey so much more information. However, the series appeals to a very 
much wider readership. Casual readers appreciate these books because they are relatively low cost and 
provide adequate introductory text with some impressive images. As a result, many new enthusiasts 
start their interest with an IoW book, making the series very important in encouraging new blood in 
reader communities. They also serve those who normally watch television and video, avoiding the 
purchase of books, but having their interest peaked and needing a book of this type to fill in what the 
video failed to provide.

This particular book is specially welcome because it rounds off the typical coverage of the SS and 
demonstrates something that is often neglected by published works. Himmler saw the development of 
the SS and the Gestapo as highly beneficial to his own ambitions of becoming Hitler's most powerful 
servant. He also saw the potential for developing a complete Nazi military machine that encompassed 
every possible military capability, with the personnel selected on racial purity and commitment to Nazi 
policies. Like many senior Nazis he distrusted the Army and the Navy. Although the Air Force was 
commanded by one of Hitler's most trusted supporters, Himmler also distrusted that service. His 
ambition saw the SS as the complete military and internal security arm of the Nazi Party that would 
eventually absorb all other military structures after they had been purged.

The author has selected some fine images that should show Himmler's ambitions had taken the SS 
from a small close protection squad, guarding Hitler, to a very efficient land warfare force with smaller 
units developing out onto the wider field of capability. In particular it shows units of the airborne force 
which was directly competing with the Luftwaffe's paratroop and glider troops, but it also covers all of 
the other specialist units that made the SS a comprehensive and capable military force that frequently 
acquired the best new weapons before they were seen by other parts of the German military.