Images of War, Rommel In North Africa, Quest For The Nile, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

The Images of War series has become extremely popular across a wide readership, including some who do not otherwise purchase military history books. This new book provides the story of one of the best known commanders of WWII, Field Marshal Erwin Rommel – Much Recommended.


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NAME: Images of War, Rommel In North Africa, Quest For The Nile, 
Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives
FILE: R2661
AUTHOR: David Mitchelhill-Green
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  230
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, Second World War, World War 2, armour, 
tanks, light tanks, medium tanks, heavy tanks, assault guns, tank 
killers, reconnaissance vehicles, desert warfare, tank warfare, 
North Africa, Libya, Egypt, Suez Canal, Afrikakorps

ISBN: 1-47389-220-1

IMAGE: B2661.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yasro8tp
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The Images of War series has become extremely popular 
across a wide readership, including some who do not otherwise 
purchase military history books. This new book provides the story 
of one of the best known commanders of WWII, Field Marshal Erwin 
Rommel – Much Recommended.

Of all of the military commanders of WWII, only a handful are 
widely known and Rommel stands out amongst his peers from all 
sides in the conflict. There is of course a strong element of myth 
but, behind that, there is still an outstanding commander who was 
respected by his opponents.

Rommel was an instructor before WWII and one of the contributors to 
the concept of Blitzkrieg. As commander of one of the Divisions 
forming the surprise attack through Belgium, France and to the 
French Chanel ports, he rapidly made his mark and earned the 
reputation that was to see him sent to North Africa to reverse the 
defeats there of the Italian Army and drive to Suez.

When Rommel arrived, the Afrikakorps was more a statement than a 
well-equipped reality. He had to demand supplies, equipment and men 
from Berlin, while attempting to work with his Italian Allies. He 
was much admired by his men, respected by his enemies and honoured 
by Churchill, although some of his officers did not regard him as 
highly and considered his tactics suspect.

Rommel relied on enemy equipment seized in his advance and depended 
on their fuel and supply dumps, rather than on his own supply train, 
but that was being realistic because his own supply system was a 
continuing problem, as fast patrol boats, submarines and aircraft 
based in Malta continued to wreak havoc in his convoys across the 
sea from Sicily and Italy. What did arrive then had to be transported 
up the narrow coast roads toward Egypt.

Rommel was reckless and ambitious. He started with a simple tactic 
of hitting the enemy from a direction they did not expect. That was 
highly successful, as he swung South into the desert and attacked the 
British flank. However, what was initially a surprise attack was 
employed too many times, ceasing to be a surprise, and Montgomery was 
able to turn it against him, stalling the German advance on Cairo and 
Suez, before throwing him back and chasing him along the coast  into 
Libya and his original start point.

The author has told the story well in text in support of an excellent 
selection of rare photographs that combine to provide fresh insight.