Images of War, Rising Sun At War, The Japanese Army 1931-1945, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

A new addition to the very popular Images of War Series. As with other volumes in this series, its great strength is the quality and rarity of the images that illustrate the concise text, all at a very aggressive cover price – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Images of War, Rising Sun At War, The Japanese Army 1931-1945, 
Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives
FILE: R2488
AUTHOR: Philip Jowett
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES:  175
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Sino-Japanese War, Manchurian occupation, WWII, World War II,
World War 2, Second World War, Pacific theatre, Indo-China, Malaya, 
Singapore, Burma, Philippines, Dutch East Indies, Aleutian Islands

ISBN: 1-47387-488-2

IMAGE: B2488.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/k5t65ux
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: A new addition to the very popular Images of War Series. 
As with other volumes in this series, its great strength is the 
quality and rarity of the images that illustrate the concise text, 
all at a very aggressive cover price – Highly Recommended.

Much that has been written about Japanese expansion in the 20th 
Century has concentrated on the rapid early Japanese advances into
territory of European colonization, the Pacific island chains, Pearl 
Harbour, and the relentless push back by the Allied amphibious forces 
to the dropping of the atomic bombs. Inevitably, this places the main 
focus on naval and air battles. In the process, the Japanese Army is 
often a bit player to the Navy and Aviation forces. That produces an 
inaccurate picture of what happened.

Japan had been held in the Middle Ages, a society of isolation, that 
began to awake in the late 19th Century. Its naval victory over 
Russia was the first shock for a world that knew little about Japan. 
As Japan learned to industrialize and consider a more active place 
in the world, it soon discovered a number of barriers to its 
development. 

The greatest challenge was in obtaining the raw materials it needed 
at an acceptable price. That created opportunity for the Army to 
campaign for territorial expansion and the process was well underway 
by 1931. Japan had to control Manchuria and expand into China, a 
bitter war, filled with atrocities and spreading into conflict with 
the Soviet Union. 

The Japanese had been able to advance across China without too much 
difficulty, but the Soviet Union proved a more difficult opponent 
that was able to force a peace on Japan. The Army then looked at the 
prospects of taking control of the Pacific Islands and Indo China. 
After Pearl Harbour, Japan felt invincible and swept all before it, 
but the war was never likely to achieve all that had been hoped for. 
In the end, Japan was unable to achieve enough victories to force a 
peace treaty on the countries it invaded and that inevitably meant 
that it would be out-produced in armaments by the US and the Allied 
nations, blocking further expansion and then seeing an inexorable 
advance by the Allies towards the Japanese home islands and eventual 
unconditional surrender to the Allies.

This book provides a very good picture of the Japanese Army during 
these eventful years. The images are first class and the text 
provides a clear view of the progression of events.