Images of War, Kent at War, Rare Photographs from Wartime Archives

The Images at War series is now a highly popular series with a well-established format, this new volume is a worthy new addition. The concise text supports the outstanding image selection very well. This is a very informative review of a part of Britain that was closest to the enemy and even within range of German guns. It was an armed camp where civilians and soldiers lived and worked closely together . – Very Highly Recommended

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NAME: Images of War, Kent at War, Rare Photographs from Wartime Archives
FILE: R2782
AUTHOR: Mark Khan
PUBLISHER: Pen and Swords
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES: 144
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: British Army, Home Guard, civilians at war, Hellfire Corner, long 
range guns, bombing, military training camps, US Army, US armour, WWII, 
gun tanks, Main Battle Tanks, technology, tactics, deployment

ISBN: 1-78346-346-5

IMAGE: B2782.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ycbh2xqt
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:  The Images at War series is now a highly popular series 
with a well-established format, this new volume is a worthy new addition.  
The concise text supports the outstanding image selection very well. This is a 
very informative review of a part of Britain that was closest to the enemy and 
even within range of German guns. It was an armed camp where civilians and 
soldiers lived and worked closely together . - Very Highly Recommended

Kent was firmly in the front line in 1940 with the evacuation of the BEF from France. It was one 
of the points where German invasion forces were most likely to land if they could establish air and 
sea superiority in the Channel. It was a base to RAF fighters defending London from air attack and 
its ports had received troops evacuated from Dunkirk, and served as bases for Coastal Forces craft 
that protected the coast and convoys, attacked German S-Boats and landed or recovered Commandos 
from the coast of Occupied Europe.

All of Kent was comfortably in range of German bombers and one of the few parts of Britain that
 could be reached by German fighters. This made it a key area in the Battle of Britain and an obvious 
area to establish military training camps and supply dumps. When the US entered the war in 1942, it 
became home for many US servicemen as they prepared for the eventual liberation of Occupied 
Europe and the drive into Germany.

Troops based and trained in Kent were to display great courage that was matched by the civilian 
population of the County.

The rare images, including some glass plate images recovered from a rubbish dump, beautifully 
convey the changing fortunes of war for Kent from potential defeat to victory. As to be expected 
from a book in this famous series, the outstanding images are very well supported by concise text.