Images of War, Hitler’s Sky Warriors, German Paratroopers in Action 1939-1945, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

A new book in the popular Images of War series, taking a look at German airborne forces. This new book provides a comprehensive look at German airborne forces in their glory days as paratroopers and glider troops to their use as elite light infantry serving on the ground – Much Recommended.


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NAME: Images of War, Hitler's Sky Warriors, German Paratroopers in 
Action 1939-1945, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives
FILE: R2663
AUTHOR: Christopher Ailsby
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  248
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, Second World War, World War 2, light 
infantry, assault gliders, paratroops, vertical insertion, airborne 
forces, special forces, elite troops

ISBN: 1-47388-668-6

IMAGE: B2663.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ya3vaolk
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: A new book in the popular Images of War series, taking 
a look at German airborne forces. This new book provides a 
comprehensive look at German airborne forces in their glory days as 
paratroopers and glider troops to their use as elite light infantry 
serving on the ground – Much Recommended.

The Soviets can claim to be the original pioneers of airborne forces 
and the only country to drop soldiers without parachutes. The British 
and Americans can claim to have lifted vertical insertion to new 
levels, moving on to the use of helicopters after WWII, but the 
Germans were the real pioneers of airborne assault troops and tactics 
that formed a part of the revolutionary tactics of Blitzkrieg.

In 1939, the Luftwaffe had built up a highly trained force of 
soldiers who would be launched into battle by glider or parachute. 
They were equipped to attack high value targets, such as forts, and 
prevent them from holding up the advance of armoured ground troops. 
In 1940, they reached the height of their achievements as airborne 
forces, but their use to take the island of Crete saw them suffer 
such heavy casualties that they were never again used as an airborne 
force in strength, serving through the rest of WWII as an elite 
ground force of light infantry.

The British and Americans learned quickly and established their own 
airborne forces in very large numbers using them very successfully 
to aid amphibious landings in Normandy, the Market Garden operation 
to open a road into Germany and then to provide mass insertions 
during the Rhine crossing. Market Garden was to be claimed a failure 
because the British paratroops failed to hold the bridge at Arnheim 
to complete the roadway into Germany, but the operation overall was 
highly successful against heavy opposition. At Normandy and the Rhine 
crossing the landings were a major success.

The author has followed the German airborne troops' story from the 
start of the war and included the Luftwaffe/SS major success in the 
daring raid to free Mussolini from prison. However, the inability to 
achieve air superiority over all battlefields was to ground the 
paratroopers and use their gliders as transports to take supplies 
and ammunition to beleaguered German ground troops who had suffered 
the loss of their ground supply routes. On the ground, the surviving 
force was used to provide elite light infantry to strengthen 
conventional ground troops and they performed with great courage and 
determination, often holding out against a superior enemy equipped 
with larger forces and heavy weapons, including bombers and ground 
attack aircraft, as at the battle for Monte Casino.

The images provide a powerful picture of the men and their specialist 
equipment and weapons. A very nicely achieved review with strong text 
in addition to the images.