Images of War, Armoured Warfare in the Vietnam War, Rare Photographs form Wartime Archives

B2157

When readers think of Vietnam, many will have a picture of dense tropical rain forest, rocky streams, close country and everything that makes armour an unlikely weapon system in that theatre of conflict. That is very far from the reality. The form of warfare engaged in was largely column warfare where armed vehicle convoys had to fight their way between strong points, or be used to set up a new strong point or fire-base. At night the Viet Cong could flow back into the areas that had been painfully cleared during the day. Armoured fighting vehicles made reasonable heavy escorts for road convoys and could become mobile armed bunkers. As with other titles in this excellent series, this book contains concise text, much in the form of photo captions, and extensive photographic illustration. Most photographs are rare and some are published for the first time in a book available to public readership. A remarkable amount of information has been packed into the pages and this book will satisfy, professional, enthusiast and novice equally.

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NAME: Images of War, Armoured Warfare in the Vietnam War, Rare Photographs form Wartime Archives
DATE: 200215
FILE: R2157
AUTHOR: Michael Green
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 192
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Vietnam War, Indo-China, Cold War, armour, tanks, armoured personnel carriers, self-propelled artillery, fire-base, column warfare, M41, M48, M113, Centurion, T-54, T-59, M24, M4
ISBN: 1-78159-381-7
IMAGE: B2156.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/nwjfxk9
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: When readers think of Vietnam, many will have a picture of dense tropical rain forest, rocky streams, close country and everything that makes armour an unlikely weapon system in that theatre of conflict. That is very far from the reality. The form of warfare engaged in was largely column warfare where armed vehicle convoys had to fight their way between strong points, or be used to set up a new strong point or fire-base. At night the Viet Cong could flow back into the areas that had been painfully cleared during the day. Armoured fighting vehicles made reasonable heavy escorts for road convoys and could become mobile armed bunkers. As with other titles in this excellent series, this book contains concise text, much in the form of photo captions, and extensive photographic illustration. Most photographs are rare and some are published for the first time in a book available to public readership. A remarkable amount of information has been packed into the pages and this book will satisfy, professional, enthusiast and novice equally.

The Vietnam War is today seen as an American war against the Communist domino concept from 1954, but the roots of the conflict go back to the late 1930s and then flowered in the insurgency against French colonial rule after WWII. The defeat of the French left Vietnam divided and therefore provided potential for civil war between the partitioned halves of the country.

Before the Americans arrived, armour included obsolete Japanese tanks left over from WWII and French light tanks that were even older. The Americans introduced armour in force but to be used as mobile fire points rather than in tank battles, the North Vietnamese not bringing their Russian and Chinese supplied armour south until the final stages of the war when they could take on Vietnamese and US forces in open battle.

The US sent WWII vintage armour in the first wave. M4 Sherman tanks, M8 and M10 armoured cars and White half-tracks. The M24 light tank was also sent out and proved suitable. The M5 and French Hotchkiss H-39 light tanks were also reasonably useful in the absence of modern opposing armour. As the war progressed, the US began to send more modern armour and then to send their latest in-service armour.

The author has documented this progress with some outstanding images, a few from museums that have restored armour of the type employed in Vietnam. Many readers will be surprised by the variety of armoured vehicles serving during the war and the illustration includes some full colour images. Recommended!!

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