Hear the Boat Sing, Oxford and Cambridge Rowers Killed in World War I

The crop of books commemorating events 100 years ago during WWI has produced many fine and thought provoking accounts. The author has taken an interesting approach to produce a poignant collection of brief biographies of 40 Boat Race competitors who answered the call to arms and gave their lives, very highly recommended.


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NAME: Hear the Boat Sing, Oxford and Cambridge Rowers Killed in 
World War I
FILE: R2466
AUTHOR: Nigel McCrery
PUBLISHER: The History Press
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  255
PRICE: £20.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War One, World War 1, First World War, The Great 
War, Oxford University, Cambridge University, rowers, The Boat Race, 
Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race, KIA, Killed In Action, soldiers, 
sailors, airmen

ISBN: 987-0-7509-6771-6

IMAGE: B2466.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/kh55xt3
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The crop of books commemorating events 100 years ago 
during WWI has produced many fine and thought provoking accounts.  
The author has taken an interesting approach to produce a poignant 
collection of brief biographies of 40 Boat Race competitors who 
answered the call to arms and gave their lives, very highly 
recommended. 

The carnage of WWI was the result of a new generations of weapons 
that burst onto the scene ahead of any effective counters. It has 
often been said that the best of a generation on both sides died 
between 1914 and 1918. It is hard to argue against that conclusion. 
Equally, it has been said that WWII was the inevitable result from a 
botched peace and a lack of fine brains extinguished in the Great 
War. Across Europe there are memorials and grave yards that record 
the enormous cost in young lives.

The author has taken an original approach which encapsulates the 
agony of a terrible war through viewing the short lives of forty 
rowers who could be said demonstrated the best brains of their 
generation. These were the privileged few who studied at the great 
universities of Oxford and Cambridge. Alongside their studies, they 
were keen rowers who came through a highly competitive process to 
represent their Universities in a unique and challenging boat race.

To a man, the magnificent forty stepped forward to join the Armed 
Services in defence of society and country. The majority served in 
the Land Forces but not just in the trenches of the Western Front. 
There were those who joined the Indian Army, the Camel Corps, the 
Australian Light Horse, the Royal Army Medical Corps. Then there 
were pilots and sailors who faced equally dangerous environments.

Within the pages there are examples of courage and comradeship. It 
is a cross section of WWI experience.