Gunfire!, British Artillery in World War II

There have been books covering British artillery in WWII, but this one really stands out. This new book is a deeply researched volume that includes many illustrations and supplements – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Gunfire!, British Artillery in World War II
FILE: R2666
AUTHOR: Stig H Moberg
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, frontline books
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  448
PRICE: £40.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, Second World War, World War 2, 
artillery, guns, gunners, towed field artillery, self-propelled 
artillery, assault guns, heavy artillery, mountain guns, howitzers

ISBN: 1-47389-560-X

IMAGE: B2666.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y8qgb7a9
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: There have been books covering British artillery in 
WWII, but this one really stands out. This new book is a deeply 
researched volume that includes many illustrations and supplements – 
Highly Recommended.

This is the most comprehensive and complete account of British 
artillery in WWII, its men, its equipment, its innovation, its 
deployment, its theatres of war, and its challenges.  There is an 
abundance of illustration and it is of the finest quality, including 
full colour maps, spread through the body of the book.

The Second World War saw many important changes in artillery. Until 
that point, there had been remarkably little change in the employment 
of artillery since its introduction in the Middle Ages. Certainly 
there had been technical advances in ammunition, the production of 
gun barrels, the sighting systems and the breech mechanisms. Rifling 
had been introduced, muzzle loaders replaced by breech loaders, and 
major advances in the casting and forging of barrels, and in the 
metallurgy. However, siege weapons were still cumbersome monsters and 
field artillery was still dependent on horses and deployed in much the 
same way. True, balloons had been employed for more than fifty years 
to provide spotting for artillery, aircraft had been used for improved 
reconnaissance for thirty years and the field telephone and radio 
transmitter had improve control and communications. It is also true 
that the German and Soviet Armies were still heavily dependent on 
horses to move their artillery, but WWII saw many advances in a very 
short time.

Britain had a small standing army and, although politicians had 
neglected the military generally since 1918, the artillery had fared 
reasonably well. The British had been able to mechanize its artillery 
and the Universal Carrier, or Bren gun Carrier, was available in 
some numbers to tow field pieces. It was essentially an open topped 
light tank that could be used as an artillery tractor, personnel 
carrier, and reconnaissance vehicle. For the larger guns and for 
higher speed, there was a selection of motor vehicles from 
militarized trucks to heavy tractors and limbers. The QF gun that 
had performed well during WWI was sill in use, but there were many 
new guns including the famous 25 pounder. Curiously, the British 
failed to use their excellent 3.7in anti-aircraft gun as an anti-tank 
gun as the Germans had with their very similar 88mm anti-aircraft 
gun which became famous as a tank killer.

As the war progressed, the British introduced self-propelled guns 
and specialist tanks to augment the traditional towed field guns, 
greatly expanded the number of anti-aircraft guns and employed mules 
to carry broken down artillery pieces through the jungles of Burma.

The author has covered all of these aspects, but also looked at 
development, construction and tactics, the men and the resources that 
made British artillery a battle winning weapon of WWII.