Great Central, from Nationalisation to Rationalisation

Nicely timed book from a Special Interests publisher as the Johnson Government prepares to continue sluicing billions down the HS2 drain. The Great Central main line is a classic of the dither and delay of British public transport planning in the second half of the Twentieth Century. – Very Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Great Central, from Nationalisation to Rationalisation
FILE: R3081
AUTHOR: Peter Waller
PUBLISHER: Unique Books
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £9.99                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: railways, railroads, steam power, diesel power, steam locomotives, 
continental loading gauge, nationalisation, Beeching Axe, Marylebone, Leicester 
Central, Sheffield Victoria

ISBN: 978-0-9957493-6-8

PAGES: 64
IMAGE: B3081.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/ur4f5sy
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: Nicely timed book from a Special Interests publisher as the Johnson 
Government prepares to continue sluicing billions down the HS2 drain. The Great 
Central main line is a classic of the dither and delay of British public transport 
planning in the second half of the Twentieth Century. – Very Highly 
Recommended.

The efforts of Sir Edward Watkins resulted in the last major main line built in Britain, 
with the arguable exception of the Euro Tunnel Line that was required to carry high 
speed trains unsuitable for the British main line network. His ambition was to connect 
the heart of British industry to London and Europe and his line was built to the 
continental loading gauge to be capable of carrying much larger trains.

The Great Central provided a model for the upgrading of all other British main line 
routes, but this did not happen. Instead, the line was to become victim to the 
vandalistic rail closures of the 1960s. Many regret the loss of this impressively 
engineered route that Watkins always envisaged as the future standard for British 
mainlines and the integration of North and South regions of England.

The author has drawn on  an impressive archive of rare and previously unpublished 
images in a pictorial tribute to  the Great Central in the last two decades of this very 
popular and important piece of rail engineering. There is a good text introduction 
and each image is supported by well written text.

A must buy for any library of rail history.