Germanicus, The Magnificent Life and Mysterious Death of Rome’s Most Popular General

B1881

The publisher has produced a long line of excellent books dealing with the history of the ancient world. This new book is well up to the high, established standards.

Germanicus is a very interesting individual who has received far less attention than he merits. This book goes a very long way to correcting the omissions of historians.

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NAME: Germanicus, The Magnificent Life and Mysterious Death of Rome’s Most Popular General
CATEGORY: Book Reviews
DATE: 021113
FILE: R1881
AUTHOR: Lindsay Powell
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 338
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Herman the German, Rhineland, Batavia, Syria, Roman Empire, Claudius, assassination, Emperor, Tiberius
ISBN: 978-1-78159-120-2
IMAGE: B1881.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/oes28pv
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The publisher has produced a long line of excellent books dealing with the history of the ancient world. This new book is well up to the high, established standards.

Germanicus is a very interesting individual who has received far less attention than he merits. This book goes a very long way to correcting the omissions of historians.

Germanicus made his reputation on his suppression of mutiny in the northern armies and in his campaign against the German tribes. He was an effective commander but he was removed and sent to the Eastern provinces and occupied lands as governor general, where he suffered a mysterious death. It may be that Emperor Tiberius considered him a potential threat and moved him away from an easy route South from the Rhine to Rome. There have been several allegations about his death and against those who might have commissioned or executed it.

There is much irony surrounding Germanicus. He was a handsome soldier, considered lively company and having much of the fame and adoration that a modern celebrity can enjoy. He appears to have held ambitions for power and Roman history is peppered with generals who became politicians and Emperors. His popularity ensured that his mysterious death would encourage a show trial to deflect any blame from Tiberius. The irony is that a man so apparently suited to the position of Emperor should fail to achieve that rank, but that his brother Claudius, who was widely regarded as a cripple and fool should become Emperor, having survived the poisonous environment that was the Roman political world.

This is an engaging book that holds the reader’s attention and the author ably argues the case. The standard of illustration is also high, including a colour plate section. Any reader with an interest in Roman history and personalities will find this a rewarding book.

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