German U-Boat Losses During World War II, Details of Destruction

B2011

This is a fully revised and updated edition of what must be the definitive reference on German U-boat losses. The author has conducted an exhaustive study and provides details of every U-boat sunk between 1939 and 1945, with the Allied units that sank them. This is an essential source for historians and enthusiasts, but it also provides a reference for anyone who is attempting to understand the enormous cost to the German U-boat service during WWII. Considering the effort expended in producing this highly detailed reference, the cover price is very aggressive, even before the traditional Pen & Sword discounting of newly published books and periodically to promote sales on multiple books relating to an anniversary or some other key event relating to the topics covered.

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NAME: German U-Boat Losses During World War II, Details of Destruction
DATE: 160814
FILE: R2011
AUTHOR: Axel Niestle
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 305
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War Two, Second World War, WWII, Battle of the Atlantic, wolf packs, U-Boats, submarines, losses, anti-submarine, hunter-killer, convoy escorts, air power, maritime patrol
ISBN: 1-84832-210-3
IMAGE: B2011.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/oqrjog2
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This is a fully revised and updated edition of what must be the definitive reference on German U-boat losses. The author has conducted an exhaustive study and provides details of every U-boat sunk between 1939 and 1945, with the Allied units that sank them. This is an essential source for historians and enthusiasts, but it also provides a reference for anyone who is attempting to understand the enormous cost to the German U-boat service during WWII. Considering the effort expended in producing this highly detailed reference, the cover price is very aggressive, even before the traditional Pen & Sword discounting of newly published books and periodically to promote sales on multiple books relating to an anniversary or some other key event relating to the topics covered.

For the professional, the historian and the enthusiast, this carefully revised reference will need no introduction and be purchased to take advantage of the revision. The author will be well known by many, having spent more than thirty years as a private researcher, specializing in the Battle of the Atlantic, but also producing other work on military history during WWII. His illustrated monographs on the most famous Type VII C and Type IX C U-boats are the finest available.

For those wishing to extend their knowledge of WWII, submarine technology and tactics, this book is essential reading and it has been laid out in a very easy to read format, providing very fast access to particular information through extensive indexing of persons, ships and aircraft. For this category of reader, a question that may spring to mind is “why does a reference, of vessels lost 70 years or more ago, require a full revision?” The answer to that is that the author is frequently invited as a historical consultant to world-wide distributed TV documentaries on German U-boats. A number of these documentaries set out to identify a U-boat wreck or to disprove established wisdom on U-boat losses. There a number of reasons why original records are not completely accurate and these documentaries often convincingly put the record straight after extensive detective work.
The German Navy did of course maintain log books and war diaries that provide core primary source information, but these do not necessarily record the loss of a specific submarine. During a war patrol, a U-boat could and did stray from a patrol area as a result of a battle or because of weather conditions. When a U-boat failed to return from patrol, as a great many did, the U-boat Service frequently used intelligent guesswork to provide a record of loss. During battle, Allied aircraft and ships only really knew which U-boat they had destroyed, if it was brought to the surface and examined, or its crew escaped, to be taken prisoner. As a result, some discovered wrecks have been initially incorrectly identified and not every wreck has been located. Some of those inspected by deep divers, and ultimately identified convincingly, have been found to be vessels that had been thought to lay some distance from where they were found.

At the end of WWII, the Allies were keen to identifying exactly what the German losses were and what had happened to every vessel lost. This was a considerable exercise and involved the study of surviving German Navy records, interviews with surviving U-boat veterans, and extensive study of Allied reports and records. Not surprisingly, Allied and German records did not all agree and in several cases pragmatism closed a record incorrectly.

The author has probably done more than any other individual to find answers to open questions and to correct mistakes in existing knowledge of the U-boat campaigns and losses.

There may well be some inaccuracies remaining, but these will be very few in number. A few errors will probably remain for all time, unless someone discovers a document somewhere, or where divers locate a previously unknown wreck. The reader can therefore rely on the tables, lists and notes that make up this fine reference work, because there is no better record and any unidentified errors will be very few in number. In supporting the text, there are charts and an excellent selection of photographs. The book cannot be commended highly enough.

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