From The Somme To Victory, The British Army’s Experience on the Western Front 1916-1918

B2177

So much has been written about the futility of trench warfare during WWI it is easy to believe that nothing new can be said. This book proves that fresh insights can be applied of the War to End All Wars. The author has produced a thought-provoking study of the British Army during the second half of the War. Crisply written, and supported by maps and a good selection of images in the photo plate section, this collection of essays provides a perceptive and original study of what may be the only war to be fought on land to such scale and intensity. Highly recommended.

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NAME: From The Somme To Victory, The British Army’s Experience on the Western Front 1916-1918
DATE: 180315
FILE: R2177
AUTHOR: Peter Simkins
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword,
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 254
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, The Great War, 1914-1918, Western Front, trench warfare, tank, tank battles, mining, static war, war of attrition
ISBN: 1-78159-312-4
IMAGE: B2177.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/l26bbx3
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: So much has been written about the futility of trench warfare during WWI it is easy to believe that nothing new can be said. This book proves that fresh insights can be applied of the War to End All Wars. The author has produced a thought-provoking study of the British Army during the second half of the War. Crisply written, and supported by maps and a good selection of images in the photo plate section, this collection of essays provides a perceptive and original study of what may be the only war to be fought on land to such scale and intensity. Highly recommended.

After the initial war of movement, as the Germans attempted to sweep around the French Army and destroy it, the Western Front settled into a war of attrition where both sides viewed each other across a sea of mud and terrible casualties were suffered for very little gain. It is very difficult to visualize the full horror of the trenches because there has never been a similar war since. That the senior commanders had little choice is not well recognized and it has become all too easy to write them off as a bunch of bloodthirsty old men who cheerfully condemned millions to a terrible death.

Once the initial German advance had been blunted by an heroic rearguard action by the British Expeditionary Force, and then rolled back by an Anglo-French counter attack of some brilliance, there was very little option for the soldiers but to begin to dig in. From the first hurried foxholes, scraped out of the ground, a huge twin defensive line stretched from the Channel Coast to Switzerland. Each side dug deeper as the months went by and began to develop new skills and technologies in building defensive works that provided a continuous line with the trenches being very close together in places, so that the troops in one line could hear the enemy across the barbed wire. That situation continued until the arrival of the tank and its use as a means of moving strong points behind which the infantry followed.

The author has reviewed the battles and the tactics, but also reviewed all of the key supporting factors of training and equipment. This will be a very valuable addition to the available knowledge of a war that may remain unique and uniquely terrible.

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