From Arromanches to the Elbe, Marcus Cunliffe And The 144th Regiment Royal Armoured Corps 1944-1945

This book follows the 144th Regiment RAC onto Gold Beach and on to the Elbe. The author has painted a vivid portrait of the tank crews as they fought their way to Germany – Highly Recommended

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NAME: From Arromanches to the Elbe, Marcus Cunliffe And The 144th Regiment 
Royal Armoured Corps 1944-1945
FILE: R2913
AUTHOR: Charles More
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 216
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Tank, AFV, Armoured Fighting Vehicle, gun tank, WWII, World War II, 
World War 2, Second World War, D-Day, Normandy Landings, D+8, Gold Beach, 
Sherman tank, Royal Armoured Corps, France, Belgium, Netherlands, River Elbe

ISBN: 1-52671-065-X

IMAGE: B2913.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y4vuaar9
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: This book follows the 144th Regiment RAC onto Gold Beach and 
on to the Elbe. The author has painted a vivid portrait of the tank crews as they 
fought their way to Germany  –  Highly Recommended

The main attention has been of the landings on D-Day and the airborne forces 
dropping inland to secure vital bridges. There is attention focussed on the Battle of 
the Bulge and Operation Market Garden, but between those points in the liberation 
of Europe there was much action, courage and determination. This book joins up the 
dots, at least for one armoured regiment.

The 144th Regiment of the Royal Armoured Corps was mounted on Sherman tanks 
and landed on D+8 at Gold Beach. They were soon into action and they had a hard 
fight ahead of them. How they coped and continued forward is an absorbing tale. 
Some of their tanks managed to destroy German Tiger Is when the Shermans they 
were equipped with were not in that league. It took skill, courage and patience to 
get into a position where the Tiger was vulnerable to them.

Breaking out from the beachhead, the 144th had a long hard road to the Elbe and 
they were one of the few British units to be closely involved in the fighting in the 
Ardennes as the Germans took one last throw, only to fail. The author has illustrated 
his account with battle maps and a good photo-plate section. Some parts of the story 
may be familiar, but much of it is new information, building into a flowing tale from 
one event to the next.