French Battleships of World War One

The larger format naval history with a high image content of photographs and drawings that the publisher excels at. – This is a well researched, and nicely illustrated book covering battleships that the French Navy had available in 1914-1918 – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: French Battleships of World War One
FILE: R2545
AUTHOR: John Jordan, Phillipe Caresse
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  328
PRICE: £40.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: French Navy, early C19th, pre-Dreadnought, Dreadnought, 
construction techniques, warships, marine engineering, Great War, 
First World War, 1st World War, World War I, World War 1, World War 
One, WWI

ISBN: 978-1-84832-254-7

IMAGE: B2545.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y7aulcgv
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The larger format naval history with a high image 
content of photographs and drawings that the publisher excels at.  
- This is a well researched, and nicely illustrated book covering 
battleships that the French Navy had available in 1914-1918  – 
Highly Recommended.

The authors have written an account of the battleships that the 
French Navy had built before WWI., their use in war and the 
development to 1922. This is a subject rarely covered in an 
English language publication and addressed with this comprehensive 
account.

The French Navy experienced a rocky time from 1815. There were 
colonies and trading centres scattered across the world, and these 
were added to through the 19th Century. Although France had a much 
smaller Empire than Britain, it had similar needs in protecting 
trade routes and projecting power. It spent time and money on moving 
from line of battle sailing ships, to steam and steel. It introduced 
the new gun systems with barbettes and turrets, mounting first larger 
muzzle-loading guns and then breech-loaders. It produced an 
experimental line of capital ships and pre-Dreadnoughts. However, the 
French Navy had only two Dreadnoughts in its fleet in 1914 when WWI 
began.

As a result, France was far behind Great Britain in battleship 
development and numbers in service and also behind Germany. The 
questions every democratic nation has to ask are – how much do we 
spend on defence, and who do we have to be able to counter?

France had to accept in 1805 that it could never again attempt to 
challenge the British in a major fleet action. That led to the French 
Navy receiving less priority for share of the defence funds available. 
Where it felt the need to compete was in the Mediterranean which had 
strong implications for French national interest and security. In 
1914 it had the most powerful fleet with a Mediterranean seaboard and 
was able to bottle up the navy of Austria-Hungary. It was also able 
to use its older battleships with distinction during the Dardanelles 
campaign and block any Russian Black Sea ships, should Russia become 
a threat after the revolution there.

This new book traces the story from 1890 to 1922, and then covers the 
extensive modifications made to surviving French battleships during 
the inter-war years. As with other books in this series, John Jordan 
covers design in Part I and Phillipe Caresse follows on with the 
historical chapters from 1900 to 1945, making an excellent 
partnership and division of labour.

The quality of illustration in photographs and drawings is first 
rate. The text is easy to read and powerful, providing that 
essential air of authority required in a book of this type. The 
end result is a book that has no direct rivals in English or in 
French, making this a book which will stand for a very long time as 
the definitive reference book on this group of topics.