Flight Craft 22, Mitsubishi A6M Zero

A great addition to the highly popular Flight Craft Series. This book reviews the history of one of the most important fighter aircraft of WWII and model kits of the A6M Zero Very Highly Recommended

NAME:  Flight Craft 22, Mitsubishi A6M Zero
FILE: R3349
AUTHOR: Robert Jackson
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £16.99                                                
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   Second World War, World War II, WWII, World War Two, aerial 
combat, fighter aircraft, models, modelling, Japanese Navy, carrier aircraft, warplanes,
Pacific Theatre

ISBN: 1-52675-994-2

PAGES: 96,  A wealth of illustration throughout the book in both full colour and 
B&W images. Most of the images are uniquely shot to illustrate this book.
IMAGE: B3349.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/s8etcbcz
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DESCRIPTION: A great addition to the highly popular Flight Craft Series. This 
book reviews the history of one of the most important fighter aircraft of WWII and 
model kits of the A6M Zero  Very Highly Recommended

This book features a high photographic content. As with sister volumes in the Flight Craft series most of the photographs have been shot specifically to illustrate the book and are of the highest quality in full colour. The clear text begins by providing an outline of the history of this important aircraft, continuing with a master class in building, from the many model kits available, to exhibition standard.

The Zero came as a shock to the Allied Forces who first encountered it and it rapidly built a legend. It was an agile fighter aircraft with a good range, having been designed as the primary Japanese naval fighter to operate from shore and from carriers. Its weakness was that it was lightly armed and not armoured. Once USN and USMC pilots understood the Zero and its weak spots they were able to get on top of it even before the next generation fighters reached the Pacific Theatre.

Allied successes in destroying Japanese carriers and shooting down aircraft soon depleted the availability of trained pilots, leading to even heavier losses and the introduction of suicide pilots who only needed training to take off and fly to, and into, their targets.