First Burma Campaign, The Japanese Conquest of 1942, by Those Who Were There

This book provides a view of the 1st Burma Campaign through the eyes of those who were there. The rapid Japanese expansion through Indo China caught the Colonial Nations off guard as they were focussed on the war in Europe. Very Highly Recommended

NAME: First Burma Campaign, The Japanese Conquest of 1942, by Those Who 
Were There
FILE: R3280
AUTHOR: complied by |Colonel E C V Foucar MC
PUBLISHER: Frontline Books, Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £30.00                                                        
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, Royal Navy, 
RAF, Army, Forgotten Army, Indian soldiers, Forgotten Theatre, Japanese Army, 
Japanese Air Force, retreat to India

ISBN: 1-52678-321-5

PAGES: 366, 6 page photo plate & campaign map in illustration
IMAGE: B3280.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y4pyz52d
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This book provides a view of the 1st Burma Campaign through the 
eyes of those who were there. The rapid Japanese expansion through Indo China 
caught the Colonial Nations off guard as they were focussed on the war in Europe. 
Very Highly Recommended

There is a modest b&w photo plate section in illustration. This is an approach to military history in which the publisher excels. Compiled by a specialist(s) in the subject and nicely produced and presented by the publisher. A larger selection of illustrations would have been good, but the modest photo plate section does provide good coverage and there is a campaign map in the beginning of the work.

The voices of those who were there tell a compelling story, unvarnished, and with heart.

The Japanese invasion of Indo China, and their surprise attack on Pearl Harbour, caught the victims off guard. The US was not fatally damaged, but the sinking of so much of their Pacific Fleet shocked the nation. The European Colonial Nations were similarly caught unprepared. Most of the troops in the area, and their equipment, was the residue left after the best had been taken to Europe and North Africa. New equipment and men were not forthcoming and although individual units fought with determination and courage they simply lacked the preparation for jungle warfare.

The long periods of colonial peace and prosperity made the minds of commanders complacent. They were accustomed to imacualted turned or parade troops and working troops engaged on policing duties, where food and comfort were present. Most failed to understand the jungle areas and regarded them as the main enemy. The Japanese were able to operate on poor rations and see the jungles as areas that gave them as many advantages as disadvantages. However, the Allies were learning quickly and the shortage of men and supplies would change to their advantage as the months rolled by.

The information provided in this work provides a good impression of how the men in the field thought and felt as they were pushed back into India. For the Japanese the progress was dramatic but not fast enough, or far enough, to be sustainable. As the Allies began to drive the Axis forces out of North Africa and gain the initiative on the ground, at sea, and in the air, British and American war production brought modern weapons to the troops in increasing numbers and it became possible to send greater quantities of effective equipment to the Burma front. At the same time, the Allied troops were learning how to fight in the jungle, air transport became available to resupply to troops, often operating behind Japanese lines, and air superiority was being taken from the Japanese. Eventually, all of the early defeats were avenged, but this book provides the picture of how it was in the beginning.