Fiddlers and Whores, The Candid Memoirs of a Surgeon in Nelson’s Fleet

An engaging and entertaining personal experience of a surgeon in Nelson’s Fleet. – Originally published by Chatham in 2006 and reprinted by the current owners of Chatham Publishing under the Seaforth imprint. A vivid picture painted with humour by one who was there – Most Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Fiddlers and Whores, The Candid Memoirs of a Surgeon in 
Nelson's Fleet
FILE: R2542
AUTHOR: James Lowry
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES:  192
PRICE: £9.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Royal Navy, Napoleonic Wars, Italy, Mediterranean, 
shipboard life, sailors, discipline, naval surgeon, ship's 
surgeon, medicine, shore leave, adventure

ISBN: 978-1-5267-0147-3

IMAGE: B2542.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ycgltwnq
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: An engaging and entertaining personal experience of a 
surgeon in Nelson's Fleet. - Originally published by Chatham in 2006 
and reprinted by the current owners of Chatham Publishing under the 
Seaforth imprint. A vivid picture painted with humour by one who 
was there – Most Highly Recommended.

During the last fifteen years, many established publishers have 
ceased to exist or been absorbed. This is particularly true of 
military history publishers. Pen & Sword acquired the Chatham 
Publishing imprint and this is one of the Chatham books that they 
have released under another of their imprints. 

The book is a fascinating memoir that was held privately by the 
Lowry family for two centuries. It provides fresh insight into a 
number of factors of the life in Nelson's Fleet and the reasons 
for joining it.

The title of surgeon in the British military during the late 18th 
and early 19th Centuries covered a multitude of sins and 
aspirations. Scotland had been producing well-trained surgeons 
for many years and had already trained the first female doctors, 
but these newly qualified surgeons often found difficulty in 
affording their necessary equipment and establishing, or buying 
into, a medical practise. As a result, Scottish surgeons tended 
to join the military to be issued with the tools of their trade, 
gain experience and seek adventure. One example was Dr William 
Bryden who went out to India with the Army, survived the Massacre 
of the Khyber Pass and the Indian Mutiny, rather than struggle to 
fund a practise in Scotland or England. Surgeons from other 
origins frequently had a more diverse set of motives, including 
the escape from creditors, addiction to alcohol, or some other 
less positive reasons. That meant that the quality of surgeons 
varied widely and many were little more than butchers who had a 
primary skill at amputation.

James Lowry was a young Irish doctor and his primary motives were 
a sense of adventure and a desire to travel. His memoirs provide 
a novel view of life in and around the British Fleet.

Lowry found the Navy both odd and intriguing. His memoirs set 
these impressions out and his lively anecdotes may seem at first 
boastful, or fanciful, many can be independently verified, 
suggesting that his account is honest and finely observed.