Ferries Across The Humber, The Story Of The Humber Ferries and the last coal-burning Paddle Steamers In Regular Service In Britain

This delightful book will be read by steam and marine enthusiasts with enthusiasm. The story of the last coal-burning paddle steamers in regular service in Britain is told well and beautifully illustrated in colour. – Highly Recommended

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NAME: Ferries Across The Humber, The Story Of The Humber Ferries and the 
last coal-burning Paddle Steamers In Regular Service In Britain
FILE: R2882
AUTHOR: Kirk Martin
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword Transport
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 166
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Humber, ferries, paddle steamers, coal-burning marine engines, last 
coal ferries, preservation, scrapping, heritage, technology, transport, passenger ships

ISBN: 1-78383-102-2

IMAGE: B2882.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yxgab3o9
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: This delightful book will be read by steam and marine enthusiasts 
with enthusiasm. The story of the last coal-burning paddle steamers in regular 
service in Britain is told well and beautifully illustrated in colour. –   
Highly Recommended

Once, Britain had many ferries that relied on coal-burning paddle steamers. The first 
steam boats and ships used paddle wheels as familiar technology, being essentially 
similar to water wheels used to power mills before the arrival of steam. They were 
mounted on either side of the vessel and that had the dual virtues of avoiding the 
need to drill a hole through the hull, or occupy internal hull space. They also 
provided great manoeuvrability because they could be used differently, potentially 
turning the vessel within its own length.

Sea going steamers also used paddle wheels initially but suffered a disadvantage not 
shared by craft in relatively calm inland waterways. In a seaway, the pitch of the 
vessel meant that a wheel would come clear of the water. This not only made it 
difficult to hold a course, but it meant the wheel instantly lost load which was then 
restored the moment it dipped back into water. This placed strain on the paddle 
wheels, gearboxes and engines. However, paddle steamers were still in use during 
the 1930s for coastal cruises and between mainland and islands.

The author has provided a detailed coverage of the last coal-fired paddle steamers in 
regular service and traced the story of what happened to them when they were 
withdrawn. He has also covered the earlier ferries across the Humber and how the 
ferries integrated with the land transport networks. This able text is fully supported 
by many full colour photographs including some taken by the author.

This book is a treat for all those enthusiasts who are interested in steam power and
 maritime heritage, but this is a book that should also appeal to a general readership.