Enemy Coast Ahead, The Illustrated Memoir of Dambuster Guy Gibson

This is one of the most important memoirs of WWII. Guy Gibson will always be remembered for leading the daring raid on the German Ruhr dams with a unique special bomb, but his illustrated memoirs cover so much more and provide a very important view into the life of pilots and commanders of RAF Bomber Command. – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Enemy Coast Ahead, The Illustrated Memoir of Dambuster Guy Gibson
FILE: R3047
AUTHOR: Guy Gibson
PUBLISHER: Greenhill Books, Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £9.99                                                                
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, World War Two, Second World War, 
1939-1945, air war, strategic bombing, tactical bombing, RAF, Dambusters, 617 
Squadron, Guy Gibson, Ruhr Valley, German war industry, heavy bombers, Lancaster 
bomber

ISBN: 1-78438-490-9

PAGES: 435
IMAGE: B3047.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/uohbfmv
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: This is one of the most important memoirs of WWII. Guy Gibson 
will always be remembered for leading the daring raid on the German Ruhr 
dams with a unique special bomb, but his illustrated memoirs cover so much 
more and provide a very important view into the life of pilots and commanders 
of RAF Bomber Command. – Most Highly Recommended.

The end of the war, and the highly successful German propaganda around the Dresden 
bombing raid, resulted in the unforgivable neglect of Bomber Command crews and 
their heroic part in WWII. There will probably always be controversy about the part of 
bombing in the progress of the war. Certainly, the huge casualty figures for German 
civilians provokes some sympathy and the post war British 'liberal' attitudes did much 
to belittle the raw courage of service personnel. However, the ruthless Nazi 
government of Germany happily embarked on the use of terror bombing with a full 
dress rehearsal in Spain before the outbreak of WWII. Once the war began with their 
brutal invasion of Poland, the Luftwaffe was consciously and deliberately employed 
to create terror in the civilian populations of those neighbours they attacked. Cities 
were bombed in a show of force and refugees were bombed and machined gunned as 
they fled the invaders, partly to cause terror and partly to use their remains to delay 
enemy troop movements by blocking roads. The Germans embarked on a war where 
they naively thought they could bomb everyone else with impunity, but no one would 
bomb them back.

In Britain, the Germans discovered a country that was prepared to fight back and to 
maintain a rapidly expanding bomber force that produced replacements and crews 
faster that the Germans could shoot them down, and where the aircraft became far 
more powerful than anything the Germans had in their armoury. German attempts to 
deliberately attack British heritage in cities such as Norwich, Coventry and London 
failed to break British resolve, only serving to build a British desire to return the 
attacks a hundred fold. However, Bomber Command sustained incredible losses and 
in 1942 were joined by the USAAF enabling the two air forces to attack around the 
clock. Bomb aiming equipment advanced significantly, bombs became more 
sophisticated and devastating, and aircraft ranged further into Germany in growing 
numbers.

Guy Gibson and his crews were gathered together to use a very special weapon to 
destroy German dams in the Ruhr Valley. The night's attack was a huge propaganda 
victory, boosting British morale and shaking German confidence. There were also 
very practical benefits in disrupting German war production. Important as this raid 
was, it was not the start of Gibson's service or of Bomber Command and both 
continued after the attacks on the dams.

Fortunately for history, Gibson managed to write his memoirs before his untimely 
death in September 1944. This is a moving and inspiring account that provides a 
very rare insight into the life of bomber commanders and crew in the greatest air 
battles ever fought. There is much illustration through the body of text and also a full 
colour photo-plate section.