De Havilland Mosquito, 1940 onwards (all marks), Owners’ Workshop Manual

B1866

The Mosquito was arguably the most important combat aircraft of World War Two. It was built largely from wood, equipped with two Rolls Royce Merlin engines and was able to outrun German fighter aircraft at the time of its introduction. Not only did the Mosquito make innovative use of materials to create a strong fast aircraft that made minimum demand on increasingly rare strategic materials, but it was to serve in a very wide range of combat roles, performing outstandingly in all of them.

The Manual does justice to an outstanding aircraft.

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NAME: De Havilland Mosquito, 1940 onwards (all marks), Owners’ Workshop Manual
CLASSIFICATION: Book Reviews
FILE: R1866
DATE: 240913
AUTHOR: Jonathan Falconer, Brian Rivas
PUBLISHER: Haynes
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 177
PRICE: £21.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Moquito, fighter bomber, fighter, night fighter, pathfinder, maritime attack, carrier aircraft, radar, hi-ball, low level flying, reconnaissance, interdiction, rhubarb, RAF, WWII, Second World War, Europe, bombing campaign, Mollins cannon, rockets
ISBN: 978-0-85733-360-5
IMAGE: B1866.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/p2zvmyl
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The Mosquito was arguably the most important combat aircraft of World War Two. It was built largely from wood, equipped with two Rolls Royce Merlin engines and was able to outrun German fighter aircraft at the time of its introduction. Not only did the Mosquito make innovative use of materials to create a strong fast aircraft that made minimum demand on increasingly rare strategic materials, but it was to serve in a very wide range of combat roles, performing outstandingly in all of them.

As a fast bomber, the Mosquito was able to carry a load similar to some famous four engine heavy bombers and to drop its bomb load with great accuracy from high altitude down to tree-top altitude. In specialist attacks on German prisons and interrogation centres, Mosquito bomber flew at roof-top height and in at least one case was able to drop its bomb through the door of a prison building and into the air raid shelter where the Germans were taking cover. This ability to bomb fast and with great accuracy made the Mosquito a natural choice as a Pathfinder, marking targets for large formations of heavy bombers.

As a maritime attack aircraft, the Mosquito was able to range out into the Atlantic and flew frequent patrols to catch U-Boats on the surface as they left their French ports. The Mosquito had a choice of weapons. The nose mounted cannon and machine guns were effective against the smaller, softer surface vessels used by the Germans. Depth bombs could be carried, but the need to attack U-Boats was to prompt the fitting of the 57mm Mollins gun to some Mosquito maritime attack aircraft, before being replaced by underwing rails to launch unguided missiles.

Equipped with radar, the Mosquito made an effective nightfighter for home defence, with the range to also fly interdiction missions into Germany to attack German fighters at night. Before the end of the war, the Mosquito was landed on a Royal Navy carrier at sea, and adapted subsequently to carry a thimble milli-metric radar, cannons, machine guns and unguided missiles, with folding wings to fit carrier lifts, for use aboard RN carriers.

The Mosquito was an excellent reconnaissance machine with the ability fly at high altitude and to outrun enemy interceptors.

The only weakness was in the wooden construction that required moulds and was to ensure that the Mosquito was difficult to maintain after 1945.

This new Owners’ Workshop Manual provides an account of the Mosquito in wartime operation. In the well-established format for the OWM series, this manual provides a wealth of information, with excellent drawings and sketches, accompanied by many photographs.

The story of the post war use made of a number of surviving aircraft is included.

It had seemed that the Mosquito would become extinct as a flying heritage aircraft. Happily, there is now light at the end of the tunnel. To restore a Mosquito in New Zealand, the restorers have built a fuselage mould. Having done this successfully, it is potentially practical to start a production line producing a number of new fuselages. From this it then becomes practical to restore a number of surviving static aircraft, or even to build a completely new Mosquito. It may therefore become possible to maintain small numbers of Mosquito aircraft in Europe, North America, New Zealand and Australia to fly displays at airshows.

The Manual does justice to an outstanding aircraft.

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