Dawn of Victory, Thank You China! Star Shell Reflections 1918-1919, The Illustrated Diaries of Jim Maultsaid

This is a unique perspective of a number of aspects of WWI that have received little or no attention at the time, or by historians since then. The author has provided many cartoons and drawings that have been reproduced through the body of the book, using full colour as appropriate – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Dawn of Victory, Thank You China! Star Shell Reflections 1918-
1919, The Illustrated Diaries of Jim Maultsaid
FILE: R2577
AUTHOR: Jim Maultsaid
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  348
PRICE: £30.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War One, World War 1, First World War, The Great 
War, Germany, BEF, Western Front, trench warfare, war of attrition, 
logistics

ISBN: 1-47389-190-6

IMAGE: B2577
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y8xvc9bo
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: This is a unique perspective of a number of aspects of 
WWI that have received little or no attention at the time, or by 
historians since then.  The author has provided many cartoons and 
drawings that have been reproduced through the body of the book, 
using full colour as appropriate – Highly Recommended.

WWI saw volunteers coming to Britain from all over the world. The 
Commonwealth contributed many soldiers who all wanted to help what 
they saw as the Mother of Empire. Many had never before travelled to 
Europe and that included large numbers who had never even travelled 
across the countries they had been brought up in. Irish volunteers 
came in numbers. In this case, the author was born  in the USA of 
Irish immigrant parents. When he arrived he was taken into the BEF 
to fight from the trenches and was seriously wounded during the 
First Day of the Somme 1916. To that point his was a story similar 
to so many. He was naturally gifted as a wordsmith and artist, 
producing and illustrating diaries of his military service. This is 
the third and final book in the trilogy that records his experiences. 
It is particularly valuable because it covers the period after his 
wounding and convalescence, when he was judged unfit for active 
service, commissioned, and sent to work with the Chinese Labour Corps 
until 1920.

The Chinese Labour Corps does not feature in the mountain of 
histories of the period, even though some 96,000 Chinese served on 
the Western Front. The Chinese worked very hard, providing critical 
logistics and turning their hands to every kind of task. This book 
tells their story graphically through very readable prose and a mass 
of unique illustrations.

From reading the typical histories of the Great War, it is very easy 
for a reader today to understand that November 1918 was the point 
where everyone packed up and went home. The scale of the conflict 
and the massive casualties meant that there was much to do after the 
Armistice came into force. There were hundreds of thousands of 
bodies that had never been recovered, identified and suitably 
buried. Even a hundred years after the events, remains continue to 
be discovered. Modern forensics science has enabled many of these 
remains to be identified and they have received full military 
honours, along with those unknown soldiers who cannot be 
identified. From that perspective it can be appreciated how large 
the task was in 1918 through to 1920. Not only were the dead to be 
identified and buried, but there were mountains of equipment an 
thousands of tons of materials to be recovered. The Chinese Labour 
Corp. provided much of the manpower for this work. This book 
provides a glimpse of their lives on the Western Front and does 
much to provide the recognition that they deserved.