Cold War 1945-1991, North Vietnam’s 1972 Easter Offensive, Hanoi’s Gamble

The Cold War series has proved very popular and this new addition to the series is up to that high standard. The combination of well-researched insightful text with a high image content at an aggressive price is too tempting to miss – Highly Recommended

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NAME:    Cold War 1945-1991, North Vietnam's 1972 Easter Offensive, Hanoi's 
Gamble
FILE: R3215
AUTHOR: Stephen Emerson
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £14.99                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   Cold War, Domino Theory, North Vietnam, South Vietnam, asymmetric 
warfare, North Vietnam Army, Vietcong, conventional warfare, armour, artillery

ISBN: 1-52675-712-5

PAGES: 128
IMAGE: B3215.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y6lrr4z9
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The Cold War series has proved very popular and this new addition 
to the series is up to that high standard. The combination of well-researched 
insightful text with a high image content at an aggressive price is too tempting 
to miss –  Highly Recommended


The Vietnam War was a sorry exercise for the US but, although they frequently made serious military mistakes in Vietnam and some dubious political decisions, the war was really lost inside the United States. It struggled on for eight years, consuming US manpower and equipment at great cost with little prospect of ever achieving a US victory.

The North Vietnamese, emboldened by the US domestic political turmoil, decided to take a major gamble and invade South Vietnam with some 40,000 regular North Vietnam Army soldiers equipped with armour and artillery, capable of fighting set piece conventional battles, pushing the South Vietnamese to the brink of defeat. Although the North Vietnamese gamble appeared to have failed, it had opened all of the divisions in the South. The lack of a US counter attack by land or air meant that defeat had become inevitable and the will to resist was broken