Churchill’s Colonel, The War Diaries of Lieutenant Colonel Anthony Barne

Two good reasons for buying this book, its a cracking read and the proceeds go to ‘Walking With The Wounded’. This is a sensitively edited collection of diaries providing many new insights – Very Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Churchill's Colonel, The War Diaries of Lieutenant Colonel Anthony Barne
FILE: R3073
AUTHOR: Anthony Barne, editor Charles Barne
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, Churchill, Royal 
Dragoons, 4th Hussars, Middle East, Palestine, Egypt, Italy, desert, tactics, armour

ISBN: 1-52675-970-7

PAGES: 323
IMAGE: B3073.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yh8eq8aq
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: Two good reasons for buying this book, its a cracking read and the 
proceeds go to 'Walking With The Wounded'. This is a sensitively edited collection 
of diaries providing many new insights – Very Highly Recommended.

The diaries kept by Anthony Barne provide many fresh insights into the Second 
World War in the Middle East and Italy. The text is very readable and offers some 
graphic comment, supported by a photo plate section with original and unpublished 
photographs from the war, including Churchill.

A back ground shared with many an officer of the time, especially in mounted 
regiments, of a rural upbringing. The family had occupied Sotterley Hall in rural 
Suffolk since 1744. Privately educated, Barne met several interesting people, and 
some irritating, at prep school, including Benjamin Britten, who was to become one 
of the most notable composers of his generation, and, at Marlborough College, future 
Poet Laureate John Betjaman who famously suggested “come friendly bomb and fall 
on Slough”.

As a young officer in 1939, Barne was stationed in Palestine and spent much of the 
war in the Middle East and North Africa, before serving in the Italian campaigns.

His diaries were maintained day by day, often under difficult conditions and they 
indicate his changing moods as battle unfolded. The writing style is warm and often 
witty taking a voice of the times which today is in itself insightful. This is one of 
those first hand accounts of history that should be read.