Churchill and Fisher, Titans at the Admiralty

The author has produced a portfolio of well-received and prize-winning naval histories. This work is an impressive re-evaluation of the Churchill and Fisher papers that includes two very helpful photo-plate sections – Very Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Churchill and Fisher, Titans at the Admiralty
FILE: R2607
AUTHOR: Barry Gough
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth Publishing
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  600
PRICE: £35.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Royal Navy, Admiralty, First Sea Lord, First Lord of the 
Admiralty, Dreadnought, arms race, Zeppelins, RNAS, convoys, 
politics, Dardanelles, Alfred von Tirpitz, German Navy, U-Boats

ISBN: 978-1-5267-0356-9

IMAGE: B2607.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y975z7p8
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The author has produced a portfolio of well-received 
and prize-winning naval histories. This work is an impressive re-
evaluation of the Churchill and Fisher papers that includes two 
very helpful photo-plate sections  – Very Highly Recommended.

Churchill and Fisher were titans at the Admiralty and their 
actions were responsible for a Royal Navy that did its duty and 
protected Great, Britain, the Commonwealth and the vital sea 
routes. They had to operate in an environment with many enemies. 
The author has provided a dramatic narrative that does justice to 
the two great characters.

Churchill's lead at the Admiralty has been over shadowed by the 
failure of the Gallipoli Campaign, his resignation and service on 
the Western Front as a field officer. Neither character received 
the acknowledgements due to them for their inspired and innovative 
work. In war, there are many surprises and reverses but what is 
most important for any armed force is to come out on top as the 
victor. The Royal Navy did that and its achievements were owed to 
the efforts of these two men.

The Press at the time, and most historians since then, have looked 
at 'failures' which are not total failures, and ignored success. 
Fisher had vision, genius and energy that was appreciated and 
matched by Churchill. Fisher had rebuilt the Royal Navy with 
significant technical advances and Dreadnought was not just an 
advance in battleship design, it was a revolution. Any battleship 
that did not ape her abilities was to be known as 'pre-Dreadnought'. 
That was not the only advance, important though it may have been. 
Britain built a series of classes of submarine that were equally 
as advanced and the Royal Navy began training pilots in 1911 to 
provide the finest naval aviation and pioneer the tactics that 
invented naval aviation for the world. A matching revolution was 
in anti-submarine warfare where the Royal Navy developed convoys, 
sonar, depth charges and convoy escorts. In all it was a series 
of major steps forward that prevented Germany from isolating 
Britain from its essential trade routes.

The author has done a first rate job of reviewing the huge changes 
in naval and aviation technology and the part that these two men 
played in keeping the Royal Navy ahead, bringing it through 
reverses and exploiting successes. An absorbing read.