British Warship Recognition, The Perkin Identification Albums, Volume I: Capital Ships 1895-1939

B2316

Seaforth is a Pen & Sword imprint with an impeccable reputation in bringing to market outstanding naval history. This new book will only add to the reputation. Working with the National Maritime Museum, Seaforth has produced the first in a multi-volume series, using the epic work of Richard Perkins. This work was based on Perkins huge library of photographs of warships and was ended only by the outbreak of World War Two and the restrictions imposed for security reasons. Volume I covers Capital Ships from 1895-1939. This work will be of great importance to all professionals and enthusiasts with an interest in this significant period of naval history. The publisher is also offering aggressive discounts for the launch period of the book which should ensure a wider audience – if you follow this period of naval history, don’t miss this book.

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NAME: British Warship Recognition, The Perkin Identification Albums, Volume I: Capital Ships 1895-1939
FILE: R2316
AUTHOR: Richard Perkin
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 176
PRICE: £50.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Capital ships, Battleships, pre WWI, WWI, pre-WWII, Royal Navy, modernization, photo record, battlecruisers, dreadnought, pre-dreadnought
ISBN: 978-1-84832-382-7
IMAGE: B2316.jpg
BUYNOW:
LINKS: http://tinyurl.com/jr7do6t
DESCRIPTION: Seaforth is a Pen & Sword imprint with an impeccable reputation in bringing to market outstanding naval history. This new book will only add to the reputation. Working with the National Maritime Museum, Seaforth has produced the first in a multi-volume series, using the epic work of Richard Perkins. This work was based on Perkins huge library of photographs of warships and was ended only by the outbreak of World War Two and the restrictions imposed for security reasons. Volume I covers Capital Ships from 1895-1939. This work will be of great importance to all professionals and enthusiasts with an interest in this significant period of naval history. The publisher is also offering aggressive discounts for the launch period of the book which should ensure a wider audience – if you follow this period of naval history, don’t miss this book.

The book does include some fine monochrome photographs, but its joy and strength is a collection of waterline drawings, many coloured, depicting the British Capital Ships of the period by Class. Most drawings include hand-written notes and these drawings are followed by detailed drawings of key identification points between warships within class, such as masts and funnels.

The publisher has spared no expense in production and this is consequently a large format book that employs heavy gloss paper. The author’s work has been reproduced extremely well and there are very few books that show this much attention to detail.

The price of £50 is very reasonable considering the quality of the book and the images it reproduces. However, in line with established Pen & Sword marketing practice, attractive discounts are available for the book launch period. The obvious target market is the committed enthusiast, model engineer, and the naval professional, but this book will have very much wider appeal. Traditionally, lending libraries would have ensured copies on their shelves but the parlous state of lending libraries in many countries may prevent this level of support and lead to many readers looking to purchase their own copy.

The period covered is very important, not just in British naval history. 1895 saw the real birth of modern naval shipbuilding. Before this period, many warships demonstrated their basis on the wooden sailing warship and its classes. Many continued to include a sailing rig even though steam was universally established. Iron cladding was still employed, although the steel-built warship was dominating production. By 1895, the warship that was to be described as ‘pre-dreadnought’ was serving in most navies, certainly in the major navies. Its reign was to be short-lived with the launching of HMS Dreadnought. This ship provided what was to be the popular layout for all capital ships, with its turbine propulsion, power turrets and with a single calibre main armament.

By 1914, the Royal Navy was equipped with capital ships that were developed from Dreadnought. The calibre of main guns had increased and superimposed turrets provided a massive weight of shellfire. The methods of steel construction had also produced very durable vessels that represented a considerable cost and which were to be modified to keep up with the new technical developments that came thick and fast.

By 1939, capital ships invariably carried spotting aircraft, some of which were themselves weapon systems. Anti-aircraft guns were also increasing and first radar systems were in production and being added to major warships.

Richard Perkins faithfully recorded this considerable development process and his work is unrivalled.

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