British Town Class Cruisers, Design, Development & Performance, Southampton and Belfast Classes

This is the form of naval history that the publisher and author excel at. The large format, beautifully produced and presented book covers one of the most important classes of cruiser to serve the Royal Navy. – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: British Town Class Cruisers, Design, Development & Performance, 
Southampton and Belfast Classes
FILE: R3127
AUTHOR: Conrad Waters
PUBLISHER: Seaforth Publishing, Pen & Sword 
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £40.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, air war, naval war, 
cruisers, major warships, convoys, sea battles, naval guns, sea lanes, submarines, sea 
mines, German warships, technology, armour, propulsion, performance, sea keeping, 
Cold War, museum ship

ISBN: 978-1-5267-1885-3

PAGES: 320
IMAGE: B3127.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/r452rb2
DESCRIPTION: This is the form of naval history that the publisher and author excel 
at. The large format, beautifully produced and presented book covers one of the 
most important classes of cruiser to serve the Royal Navy. – Most Highly 
Recommended.

The 'big gun' warship is often thought of as the battleship, with guns of 14in to 18in, 
in the period leading towards WWII, the USN and Japanese Imperial Navy began 
introducing large 6in gun warships. The British Town Class cruisers were designed to 
match these new vessels. Britain has a very poor record of preserving its important 
warships but, fortunately one of the ten British Town Class cruisers, HMS Belfast, 
has been preserved and is open to the public as a museum moored on the River 
Thames, opposite from the Tower of London.

The Town Class vessels performed with distinction and suffered heavy damage, four 
of the ten being lost and the survivors requiring major repairs. In the Battle of the
Barents Sea, HMS Belfast ran down and sank the powerful German Scharnhorst. Into 
the 1950s and the Cold War, the remaining Town Class continued in service with the 
last to decommission being HMS Belfast, which was handed to the Imperial War 
Museum to be preserved as a museum ship, a role she continues to fulfill, having 
already received one major refit when she was towed back to Portsmouth for dry 
docking and then towed back to the Thames to again open to the public.

The author has provided what must be the definitive history of the class with the text 
being strongly supported by a fine selection of photographic images and technical 
drawings through the body of the book.